FOR YOUR HEALTH – Tips For Tailgating: Add A Little Healthy Balance

(NAPSI)—Tailgates typically mean enjoying lots of fun foods and big flavors. The good news is that you can enjoy tasty treats and activities that bring a little healthful balance to the festivities.

Smarter tailgating can be as simple as adding some nutritious treats to the menu—and staying on your feet a little longer throughout the day.

“Everyone loves a good tailgate with family and friends, but it’s important to remember that the main activities are usually sitting and eating. Bring a little healthy living back into the mix with foods like blueberries,” says Jenna Braddock, RDN and spokesperson for the Blueberry Council. “Everyone loves the delicious flavor of blueberries—and they love your body back with nutritious benefits. Try a recipe like my gluten-free Boozy Blueberry Bacon Bites, a finger food that’s easy to eat and easy to savor.”

Smart and Delicious Choices

Here’s another tip to encourage healthier tailgate habits: Rather than have all food out all day, set a “meal time” for the main dishes. Before and after that time, set out healthy snack options like blueberries. That way, guests can still graze while being mindful about what they’re eating.

It may also help to bring your own food into the stadium, where easy-to-eat finger foods like blueberries make a natural choice. They taste deliciously refreshing on a warm day, and they’re a good source of fiber, helping you stay full and satisfied—and away from the concession stands. Many stadiums allow outside food if it’s in a clear container, but it’s important to check the policy ahead of time.

Healthy Anytime

Blueberries contain just 80 calories per cup, are low in sodium and contain virtually no fat, making them a go-to food for experts like Jenna Braddock. They’re also a good source of vitamin C, which boosts the immune system-great for tailgates and events as the weather gets cooler.

Staying Active

A little bit of planned activity goes a long way at a tailgate. Even 10-minute bouts of movement will help meet your daily exercise needs. Try:

  • Walking around to visit other tailgaters
  • Playing games like cornhole, horseshoes or Jenga
  • Throwing a Frisbee or football
  • Organizing a relay race
  • Parking farther away to get a good walk in (and get out faster).

Learn More

For more ways to enjoy blueberries at all your favorite events, visit www.PositivelyBluetiful.com.

Roland’s Trivia Question, Week of October 11, 2018

What was the Houston Astros nickname in 1962, 1963, and 1964? – (Thank you Michael.)

Answer:

The Houston Colt 45s.

SCORES & OUTDOORS: Even though they are not welcome, mice just keep coming

The common meadow vole.

Roland D. Halleeby Roland D. Hallee

We’ve covered this subject before, but I think it’s worth another go-round.

Earlier this year we talked about the rather large number of squirrels running around our countryside – even city-side – and the many we find dead along our roads. Well, I want to know how come there is now a proliferation of mice. Last year, I trapped 13 mice in my camp in the month of September alone. That pales in numbers compared to this year. In the month of September – 17 mice trapped in camp. And we’re still counting. Camp is closed for the winter, but I check in periodically to find if I have trapped any more. Incidentally, my neighbors are experiencing the same problem.

Over the 30 years my wife and I have had our camp, we had only sporadic sightings of mice inside the building. The last two years have seen a population explosion.

A small mammal, although a wild animal, the meadow vole, Microtus pennsylvanicus, sometimes called a field mouse, is active year round.

A lot of people confuse the field mouse with house mice. They are a little different. A house mouse in uniformly brown-gray, right down to the tail. They typically have small hands and feet with big eyes and ears. And if you have a house mouse, you will know it because of their strong smell.

Common field mouse.

The meadow vole has sandy brown fur and a white to gray belly. A cautious mouse which always sniffs anything unfamiliar before approaching, this mouse does not have a very strong smell. Which, obviously, is why I didn’t know we had mice in the house. There was no odor. The mice I have been catching also have white bellies.

The meadow vole has the widest distribution of any North American species. It ranges from Labrador west to Alaska and south from Labrador and New Brunswick to South Carolina all the way west to Wyoming. They are also found in Washington, Idaho and Utah.

Meadow voles have to eat frequently, and their active periods are associated with food digestion. They have no clear 24-hour rhythm in many areas.

Contrary to what you see in the cartoons, mice do not like cheese. They actually like to eat fruits, seeds and grains. They are omnivorous, which means they eat both plants and meat. The common house mouse will eat just about anything it can find. In fact, if food is scarce, they will eat each other. (I bait my traps with peanut butter – works every time!) They have voracious appetites, and usually build their nests near places that have readily accessible food sources.

Male mice are usually ready to mate after six to eight weeks. One captive female produced 17 litters in one year for a total of 83 young – no wonder the population is escalating. One of her young produced 13 litters (totaling 78 young) before she was a year old.

The house mouse, Mus musculus, originally came from Asia, colonizing in new continents with the movement of people. Either of the three species can transmit diseases, though not on the same scale as rats.

Common house mouse

The house mouse lives more comfortably with humans, while field mice, Apodemus sylvaticus, prefer to live underground, although they will, from time to time, enter buildings.

The house mouse and field mouse are nocturnal and are active only at night, while meadow voles have no time schedule. My little intruders are active only after dark, especially in the early morning hours.

They also have strange names. Females are does, males are bucks and babies are called pinkies. In the wild, the life span of mice is usually one to two-and-a-half years.

If a female lives 2-1/2 years, and can produce up to 17 litters a year (up to 83 pinkies), that comes up to a lot of little mice, which will grow to be adult mice, roaming around out there. The numbers seem to be climbing.

I know they are looking for warm and dry shelter for the winter, and ready supply of food, but they are not welcome in my world.

MOOSE UPDATE

According to Lee Kantar, state moose biologist for the Maine Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife, Aroostook County remains a stronghold for moose in Maine. This September moose hunting season has been off to a great start with cold morning and all. “We currently are heading into the sixth year of our moose research study on adult cow and calf survival,” he said. “While winter tick has become a large focus of our work and the news, the reality is that the winter tick attacks smaller moose which is primarily overwintering ‘calves’ trying to make it through their first winter. Adult winter ticks feed on moose from mid-winter to early spring and can be a physiological tax on those moose that carry heavy tick loads. Again our survival study shows that the biggest impact by winter ticks has been on overwintering calves in our western study area. Overwintering calves in our northern study area have double the survival rates. Adult cows in both our western and northern study areas continue to have high annual survival rates.”

Roland’s trivia question of the week:

What was the Houston Astros nickname in 1962, 1963, and 1964? – (Thank you Michael.)

Answer can be found here.

I’M JUST CURIOUS: What do you think?

by Debbie Walker

Do you remember years ago when the scare about eggs came out? We weren’t supposed to eat more than one egg a week. It wasn’t just ‘don’t fry them,’ it was only one a week. NOW according to the American Heart Association we can have one a day!

For years we had paper bags and then …. We moved into plastic bags to save trees (and there has been the collateral damage of the woodsmen and paper mills). Other than some bags made of fabric most of the ones I see seem to have some form of plastic woven in. The plastic bags and products are killing off water creatures, big and small. I am not making light of pollution in any way, just our ‘over use’ society. (Did you ever notice in the grocery stores how just one or two items sometimes have their own bags?)

Plastic, how wonderful. That’s right? We got rid of glass bowls for plastic (somehow an oil byproduct) to use in the microwave (Health? Microwave?). Oops, now the plastic is not good for us so we are encouraged to go back to glass. I imagine the plastic jars and bottles will go back to glass one day or onto the next health problem product.

Marijuana is a product thought once to stunt our brain cells and it was, until recently, illegal here. Now you can buy it and medical byproducts at even the little country corner market. It was thought for a long time when the government figured out how to tax it properly that it would be available to all. I guess they figured it out.

For generations, families were their own biggest resource. Processing their own food and the preparation of such was all important for survival. After more years went by the farms and the gardens disappeared as more of our foods and products became out-sourced. We lost so many farms and local businesses. In recent years we have seen an increase of folks wanting to do things the old ways with new local people learning the old ways sprinkled with new technology. It seems people are willingly going back to the basics in all walks of life.

I guess over time a lot of things have and will continue to change back to the way they were. I do hope that toilet paper is not one of those things. I hope I don’t live long enough to see that one go backwards. I forgot, it can’t. We don’t have the old Sears’s catalogs to leave in our bathrooms anymore!

So what do you think?

I do have new T-shirts to add to the collection of sayings: “Children are Spoiled because No One will spank Grandma!” (Love that one!) AND “Mirror, Mirror on the wall I Am my MOTHER after all.”

I’m just curious if you find odd things humorous like I do? How about if you share some of yours. Contact me at dwdaffy@yahoo.com. I’ll be waiting! Thank you for reading.

Local youth waiting for Big Brothers and Big Sisters

Nine-year-old Briannah is patiently waiting for the news that she has a Big Sister. She’s anxious to talk with her new friend about her interest in geology, maybe find unique rocks together in the Skowhegan community where she lives, and is especially excited to share her love for animals. Her mom, a single parent, hopes a one-to-one relationship with a female role model will give her daughter self-confidence, raise her aspirations and set her on the path to success.

Briannah is among 25 youth facing adversity in Kennebec and Somerset counties currently waiting to be matched with positive, adult role models to serve as community-based mentors through Big Brothers Big Sisters of Mid-Maine. According to Gwendolyn Hudson, BBBSMM executive director, about 60 percent of those waiting are young boys.

“It is not uncommon that women tend to volunteer to mentor more often than their male counterparts,” Hudson said, citing national BBBS of America statistics, but said the agency hopes to change that trend by finding caring, compassionate males in the community ready to share a little bit of their time to help change the life of a child.

BBBSMM recently started a “Waiting Wednesday” social media post on their Facebook and Instagram platforms, highlighting youth waiting to be match with community mentors.

Big Brother Richard Behr and his Little Brother, Jaxen, have been meeting every week for more than four years. Jaxen, now a teenager, was nine years old when they first met, and unsure what it would be like to have a Big Brother. His mother said he had intense anxiety in new situations and as a working parent with other young children at home, she recognized he wasn’t getting the one-on-one time with her that he used to. He was interested in outdoor activities, but didn’t have anyone to go with him. She said she hoped having a mentor would help Jaxen increase his confidence and give him the motivation to try new things.

Today, the match between Richard and Jaxen has brought them together to hike, snowshoe, fish and take on fun building projects together.

Adults interested in learning more about becoming a community-based mentor should contact Big Brothers Big Sisters of Mid-Maine by calling 207-370-1674 or emailing reneeigo@bbbsmidmaine.org. For more information about how you can change the life of a child through volunteering or supporting Big Brothers Big Sisters of Mid-Maine, visit bbbsmidmaine.org.

REVIEW POTPOURRI – TV: NCIS; Conductor: Andre Cluytens; Film: Dark Eyes; Music: Liszt

Peter Catesby Peter Cates

NCIS

Current Netflix 15th season

Mark Harmon

This program featuring naval intelligence stories is one that keeps on giving. I am convinced some viewers watch it for the facial expressions of Mark Harmon alone. The balance of humor and suspense is another factor. The addition of Maria Bello as special agent Jack is a third factor. The series is one special in ways beyond description. Try the first five episodes of the 15th season. They are entertaining.

Andre Cluytens

The Complete Concerto and Orchestral Recordings
Erato. 65 CDs.

Andre Cluytens

The conductor Andre Cluytens (1905-1967) was one very gifted individual. I have been collecting his recordings for about 20 years. They are the gift that keeps on giving as far as I am concerned. Beethoven Concertos with Solomon and Oistrakh. Debussy, Ravel, Franck, Bizet, Gounod, Rimsky-Korsakov, Rossini, etc…

The best approach would be to sample the various YouTubes and decide if he is for you. There are videos as well.

Dark Eyes

Nikita Mikhalkov

Dark Eyes is the 1987 film of Nikita Mikhalkov. Francis Lai’s soundtrack is a mixture of Mozart, Strauss, Rossini, Lehar and Francis Lai himself, most famous as the composer of A Man and a Woman. It is a mix most suitable for pleasant ambiance at dinner parties and very listenable. The soundtrack is on the DRG label, a cassette with the catalog number SBLC 12592. The actor Marcello Mastroianni.

Liszt

Piano Concerto No. 2; Sonata in B minor.

Franz Liszt

The Concerto has Walter Susskind conducting the Philhar­monia Orchestra and the Angel lp is from the ‘50s – Angel 35031. Again this Polish pianist, Witold Malcuzynski, knew how to make the kind of music making that wore well, much like the conductor Andre Cluytens. His Liszt recordings had the combination of musicality and virtuosity that elevated my fondness for this composer, the 2nd Concerto and Sonata being cases in point.

YouTube is a good place to sample these selections mentioned above.

National Fire Prevention week

Jordynn Mann and Micah Waldie learn about the personal protective gear that firefighters wear in a fire environment with call firefighter and president of the Winslow Fire Association Nathaniel White. Winslow Fire & Rescue held their annual open house on Sept. 29, in preparation for National Fire Prevention week, Oct. 8. (Photo by Tawni Lively, Central Maine Photography staff)

Anne Guadalupi named to Assumption College spring 2018 dean’s list

Assumption College, in Worcester, Massachusetts, has announced that Anne Guadalupi, of Augusta, is one of 590 students named to the College’s prestigious undergraduate Dean’s List for the spring 2018 semester. Guadalupi is a member of the Class of 2021.

Delaney Curran wins UVM George M. Happ award for biology

The University of Vermont Biology Department, in Burlington, Vermont, presented Delaney Curran, of Skowhegan, with the George M. Happ Award during the May 18 College of Arts and Sciences Awards Ceremony.

This award is presented to a student with outstanding academic performance and excellence in research in biology. Dr. Happ arrived at the University of Vermont as a professor and chairman of the Department of Zoology in 1978. He was instrumental in transforming the faculty to a teacher-scholar model and prioritized obtaining funding to stimulate research.

Beverage enrolls at Eastern Connecticut

Eastern Connecticut State University, in Willimantic, Connecticut, recently released its list of newly-enrolled students for the fall 2018 semester. Blake Beverage of Somerville, is attending Eastern this fall. Beverage’s major is biology.