Common Ground Round 8: Win a $10 Gift Certificate

DEADLINE: Friday, September 13, 2019

Identify the people in these three photos, and tell us what they have in common. You could win a $10 gift certificate to Retail Therapy boutique, 11 KMD Plaza, Kennedy Memorial Dr., Waterville, next to the Dairy Queen!* Email your answer to townline@fairpoint.net or through our Contact page with subject line “COMMON GROUND 8.”

Please include your name and address with your answer, so we can mail your prize if you are the winner!

You may also mail your answer to The Town Line, PO Box 89, South China, ME 04358. (To be eligible for the drawing, you must email or snail mail your answer to us.)

* Should there be more than one correct answer, a random drawing will be held to determine the winner.

Previous winner: Carrie McGrath, So. China

Left to right, Craig T. Nelson, Ricky Nelson, Willie Nelson. They all share the same last name.

FOR YOUR HEALTH – Healthful School Lunches: What Parents Need To Know

(NAPSI)—The healthfulness of school lunches is one of the top three parental concerns of this school season, according to a recent survey conducted by OnePoll.

The survey covered a number of parental worries for their school-aged kids, including their safety, whether they’ll make new friends, quality of education, and homework load. However, 44 percent of respondents prioritized healthful school lunches after the quality of their children’s teachers, and ahead of the cost of school supplies.

Taking a deeper look into school lunches, the survey also found that the average child buys lunch about three times a week and, while healthful eating is a top concern for parents, 36 percent admitted they don’t typically know what their child eats at school.

Making Good Nutrition A Part of Kids’ Everyday Life

What with pizza, mystery meat, and the variety of fried options offered at school, most parents say their child eats healthiest when at home or when they pack their kids’ lunches themselves. Unfortunately, the survey also found that 45 percent of parents admit that they don’t always have time or have forgotten to prepare a sack lunch for their kids to take to school.

“Parents have enough to worry about and what their kids are eating in school should be the last thing they have to think about. Yet, unfortunately, parents have deep fears about what their kids are eating in lunchrooms across the country,” says Dr. John Agwunobi, pediatrician, co-president and Chief Health and Nutrition Officer at Herbalife Nutrition. “We all have a responsibility to ensure our kids are getting the most nutritious meals possible, and I applaud school districts around the country that are working with parents to improve both the nutrition levels and taste of school meals.”

According to the survey, only about a quarter of parents know both the nutrient and calorie value of the foods their children eat for lunch, whether homemade or purchased.

The Importance of Knowing Nutritional Value of Food

Building a balanced meal—including dairy, vegetables, fruits, grains and protein—doesn’t have to be complicated or take a long time. What is most important is making sure that the calories your children consume are jam-packed with the nutrients they need for energy and growth—a concept known as “nutrient density.” Emphasizing nutrient-dense foods is a great way to rethink how you pack your kids’ lunches—and how you plan meals at home, too.

Simply put, nutrient-dense foods are those that pack a lot of nutrients relative to their calorie cost. When choosing between two food items with the same calorie amount, one food choice could provide your body with the protein, fiber, healthy fats, vitamins or minerals it needs every day, while another choice may provide empty calories from sugar and saturated fat with no other significant nutrients.

Ideally, a meal should be made up of mostly nutrient-dense foods, with fewer “calorie-dense” foods—such as fats and sugars—which are high in calories relative to the nutrients they contain.

When parents do pack a lunch, the survey reported, tasty food is their top priority (64 percent), as well as foods that parents know their child will eat (64 percent), followed by healthy options (62 percent). Some ideas for nutrient-packed, healthful foods that most kids will enjoy include omega-3-rich tuna fish, sweet and crunchy carrots, strawberries packed with potassium and vitamin C, and nuts, which can replace chips to satisfy cravings for salty, crunchy items. However, the survey also found that the peanut butter and jelly sandwich continues to be the staple menu item most parents pack for their children. To make it more nutrient dense, parents can simply replace the white bread with whole grain bread and use a low- or no-sugar-added peanut butter and jelly, to make the sandwich more healthful, with better nutritional value.

Learn More

For more facts and tips on healthful and tasty options for yo`ur kids’ lunches, visit www.iamherbalifenutrition.com.

Mitchell Caron graduates from Castleton University

Mitchell Caron, of Augusta, graduated with a bachelor of science in exercise science from Castleton University, in Castleton, Vermont, following the successful completion of the spring semester in May 2019.

Students earn degrees from the University of Vermont

Area students recently earned degrees from the University of Vermont, in Burlington, Vermont, during commencement.

Peter Ackerman, of Augusta, graduated with a bachelor of arts degree in film and television studies.

Devin Beckim, of Augusta, graduated with a bachelor of science degree in computer science.

Emily Higgins, of Waterville, graduated cum laude with a bachelor of science degree in athletic training education.

Natalie Palmer, of Augusta, graduated with a bachelor of science degree in environmental studies.

Kaitlyn Sutter, of Palermo, graduated with a bachelor of science degree in professional nursing.

Area teams take part in Battle for Breast Cancer field hockey tourney

Members of the Winslow field hockey team, front seated, left to right, Leah Pelotte and Lainey Bell. First row, Coach Mary Beth Bourgoin, Bohdi Littlefield, Savannah Joler, Haley Moore, Taylor Rodriguez, Alaina Lambert, Sage Clukey and Alayna Morneault. Back row, Kayla Hanson, Marisa Elwell, Madison Lower, Silver Clukey, Mariah Morrison, Justice Picard, Abby Wright, Kassidy Bibeau, Hunter Lee, Lilly Harvey, Sabrina York, and coach Lori Fredette. (photo by Missy Brown, Central Maine Photography staff)

Members of the Skowhegan field hockey team, front row, from left to right, Meredith Mitchell, Samantha Bonneau, Sydney Curtis, Emily Reichenbach, Chloe Dubois, Olivia Hatch, Lexi Michonski, Bhreagh Kennedy, Brooklyn Hubbard, Cheyenne Anthony and Mackenzie McConnell. Second row, Jackie Dodge, Nyah Gunst, Harlee Taylor, Kate Kelso, Paige Gilbert, Logan Wing, Mariah Whittemore, Jordyn Flannery, Norrie Tibbetts, Ella Siren and Laney Leblanc. Back row, Coach Tammie Veinotte, Coach Paula Doughty, Riley Enright, Samantha Thebarge, Kayla Furbush, Rachel Tuck, Hannah McKenney, Zoe Nicholls, Emillie Burchett and Brooke Gilbert. (photo by Missy Brown, Central Maine Photography staff)

Colby-Sawyer College students fulfill internship requirement

Internships are field experiences designed to provide a student learning opportunity under collaborative supervision between Colby-Sawyer College faculty, staff, in New London, New Hampshire, and work site professionals. Internships offer opportunities for students to enhance their academic programs with work experience related to career interests in all industry areas in national and international settings.

Haley Carver, of Sidney, is completing Colby-Sawyer College’s internship requirement at Northern Light Health Inland Hospital, in Waterville. Carver is majoring in sociology and is a member of the class of 2020.

Chelsea Perry, of Oakland, is completing Colby-Sawyer College’s internship requirement at MaineGeneral Health, in Waterville. Perry is majoring in business administration and is a member of the class of 2021.

Zach Smith named to NESCAC All-Academic

Zach Smith of Waterville, has received 2018-19 NESCAC Spring All-Academic honors. Smith, the son of Mr. and Ms. Patrick D. Smith, of Waterville, is a 2017 graduate of Waterville Senior High School. He is majoring in psychology at Bates College, in Lewiston.

Smith, a member of the Men’s Track & Field team, is one of sixty-eight students from Bates College’s soring sports teams who received the honor from the New England Small College Athletic Conference. To be honored, a student-athlete must have reached sophomore academic standing and be a varsity letter winner with a cumulative grade point average of at least 3.50 (raised from 3.40 a year ago).

Lasell College students named to dean’s list

Lasell College, in Newton, Massachusetts, announced today students named to the dean’s list for their academic accomplishments in the Spring 2019 semester.

To be named to the dean’s list, Lasell students must complete at least 12 credits as a full-time student and achieve a semester GPA of 3.5 or higher.

The students are Alison Linscott, of Waterville, and Grace Redwine, of Freedom.

 

URI students named to the spring 2019 dean’s list

The University of Rhode Island, in Kingston, Rhode Island, is pleased to announce the Spring 2019 dean’s list. The students represent nearly all of Rhode Island’s cities and towns, all six New England states, New York and New Jersey, and many other states and countries.

The students are Alexandria Jarvais, of Madison, and Kristy Prelgovisk, of Oakland.

Emmanuel College names local students to spring dean’s list

In honor of their outstanding academic achievement, Emmanuel College, in Boston, Massachusetts, has named more than 700 students to the Dean’s List for the Spring 2019 semester. To earn a spot on the Dean’s List, Emmanuel students must achieve a grade point average of 3.5 or higher for a 16-credit semester. The following local students were awarded:

Sarah Desrosiers, of Winslow, Micah Riportella, of Sidney, and Katherine Thompson, of Waterville.