For Your Health: What You Should Know About Vaccines

For Your Health

(NAPSI)—Sometimes, what you don’t know can hurt you. Consider this: Smallpox vaccines were used as far back as the Revolutionary War. This serious disease, which has killed more people than all the wars combined, has been wiped from the Earth by vaccines. It’s a shame that recently the safety of vaccines has been questioned. It’s time people focused on the facts.

Vaccines have long been one of the safest medical treatments. No credible study has proven otherwise. Just like other medicines, vaccines are approved by the FDA. By and large, the rewards of prevention are worth the small risk of any vaccine’s side effects.

Another fact is that vaccines for mature Americans can save lives. When seniors get pneumonia shots, they could lengthen their life expectancy by FOUR years. Flu shots will also protect seniors from a debilitating illness with life-threatening consequences. Vaccinations are generally affordable and they are SAFE.

What To Do

For your health’s sake, give vaccination a shot.

If you have questions about a vaccine, talk to your doctor. They can explain the safety of vaccines and their importance to your health. There are three easy steps you can take to get protected:

1. Find out which vaccines you need. You can go to the RetireSafe website, www.retiresafe.org, and click on the vaccine icon on the left side of the home page. It will take you to a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention site that will ask you questions about you and your life. It will then give you a list of vaccines you may need.

2. Discuss the vaccines on the list with your doctor or health care professional.

3. Get the recommended vaccinations.

That’s it…that’s all you have to do to be healthier and possibly add years to your life.

SCORES & OUTDOORS: Proliferation of stink bugs

Roland D. HalleeSCORES & OUTDOORS

by Roland D. Hallee

They seem to have invaded our environment and taken up permanent residence in the state of Maine. We are seeing more and more of them in and around our homes. More so this time of year when the critters are attempting to come indoors where its warm. They are commonly known as stink bugs.

The brown marmorated stink bugs are an invasive species and are considered a serious crop pest. They are notorious at attacking especially corn and potatoes. They were accidentally introduced in the United States from Asia. It is believed to have hitched a ride as a stow-away in packing crates or on various types of machinery. The first documented specimen was collected in Allentown, Pennsylvania, in 1996. It is now found in the eastern half of the U.S. as well as California, Oregon, Washington, Arizona, New Mexico and Texas.

Since arriving from Asia, the stink bug spread quickly from state to state, and is now listed as a top invasive species of interest by the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) since 2013. They spread quickly due to their ability to lay more than 100 eggs each spring and summer. The USDA now reports the stink bug can be found in 44 states.

marmorated stink bug

It is easily identifiable by its brown color, six legs, shield-like pattern on its shell, white segments on its antennas and the cilantro-like smell it emits when scared or crushed.

The stink bug gets its name because it releases an odor when disturbed or when crushed. They will emit a foul-smelling chemical when they are injured, startled or attacked.

Generally, adult stink bugs feed on fruits, while nymphs will dine on leaves, stems and fruit. Stink bugs eat peaches, apples, peppers, soybeans, tomatoes, grapes and others. According to USDA records, the stink bug caused farmers to lose $31 million in 2010, which is the most up-to-date figures available. Their ability to possibly spread throughout the country has the agricultural community nervous.

In the fall, they search for sites to avoid the winter weather. They re-emerge in early spring and become active. During the warmer summer months, they can be found congregating en masse on the sides of buildings. Stink bugs have a life expectancy of nine to 10 months.

They enter homes through windows, cracked foundations, dryer vents and door jambs. Once inside, they seek refuge in warm places, like insulated walls. It is not uncommon to find thousands of them inside a house.

Stink bugs are not poisonous to humans and do not normally bite. Although native stink bug species exist in the U.S., none have caused damage to crops and invaded homes in numbers like the brown marmorated stink bug. However, some people are allergic to the marmorated stink bug, with reactions that include eye watering, congestion and coughing.

Stink bugs present no known danger of damaging the home, however, large amounts of dead stink bugs in the walls of the home can attract carpet beetles, which eat wool. That may explain why, all of a sudden, some of your clothes hanging in closets have developed holes.

To prevent stink bugs from entering homes and buildings, seal cracks around windows, doors, siding, utility pipes, behind chimneys and underneath the wood fascia and other openings. Use a good quality silicone or silicone-latex caulk. If you need to remove stink bugs already established in the home, a vacuum cleaner can aid in the removal. However, make sure to empty the vacuum cleaner outdoors after using to avoid the odor that will probably permeate throughout the house from disturbing the bugs.

Although studies are being conducted on how to handle the growing problem, farmers don’t currently have too many options. Pesticides that are used for other bugs can work, however, unless the pesticide hits the bug directly, it won’t make much of a difference in the stink bug population.

The Maine Department of Agriculture, Conservation and Forestry asks anyone who finds a stink bug to take a picture and fill out an online survey. That could be a cumbersome project.

I have not seen any marmorated stink bugs in my home, but I have seen many around homes of family and friends, especially those residing in rural areas. Most merely dismiss it as nothing more than a nuisance and simply deal with them one at a time, as they appear.

What else can you do?

I’m Just Curious: Mother’s sayings

by Debbie Walker

As usual I am just curious. I am going to share these “Hilarious Things My Mother Taught Me…”. I am sure it was e-mailed to me quite some time ago and I printed it off for a future reference. And, yes Mom, I did recognize a couple of these and I think I have used a few myself!

1. My mother taught me TO APPRECIATE A JOB WELL DONE. “If you are going to kill each other, do it outside. I just finished cleaning.”
2. My mother taught me RELIGION. “You better pray that will come out of the carpet.”
3. My mother taught me about TIME TRAVEL. “If you don’t straighten up, I’m going to knock you into the middle of next week!”
4. My mother taught me LOGIC. “Because I said so, that’s why.” Yes Mom, I remember hearing that and I remember using it myself!
5. My mother taught me MORE LOGIC. “If you fall out of that swing and break your neck, you’re not going to the store with me.” (I love that one!)
6. My mother taught me FORESIGHT. “Make sure you wear clean underwear, in case you’re in an accident.” I would love to know if anyone was left out on that one!
7. My mother taught me about IRONY. “Keep crying, and I’ll give you something to cry about.” Oh yes Mom, I remember that one. Ranks right up there with “I want to change my name, even just a day!”
8. My mother taught me about the science of OSMOSIS. “Shut your mouth and eat your supper.”
9. My mother taught me about CONTORTIONISM. “Will you look at that dirt on the back of your neck?”
10. My mother taught me about STAMINA. You’ll sit there until all that spinach is gone.”

I’m not giving this one a number but poor Mom. If she did it once she did it a hundred times. It seems that all tops for anyone big busted have always been very low cut. Mom found more safety pins to fix any tops I had!

Since our weather has really been the pits for a few days I want to share a poem I saw in the Kids version of The Old Farmer’s Almanac:

“When pigs carry sticks, The clouds will play tricks; When they lie in the mud, No fears of a flood.”

“If bees stay at home, rain will soon come; If they fly away, Fine will be the day.”

I had to add this: When having to paint trim (mirror, around windows, etc.) you can keep paint off the glass. You can dip a Q-tip in petroleum jelly and apply to the glass where it meets the frame. When paint is dry just wash the glass.

As usual I am just curious what your memories are. It’s time to share! Thank you for reading. Contact me at dwdaffy@yahoo.com with questions or comments. Check out our web page!

REVIEWS: Singer: Pat Boone; Guitarist: Jim Hall; Book: Roosevelt and Hopkins

Peter CatesREVIEW POTPOURRI

by Peter Cates

How I Started Collecting Records, Part 4.

Pat Boone

Around 1957, I discovered the resounding voice of the then 23-year-old Pat Boone and the beginning of a spurt of hit 45 singles that sustained him until 1960. The first one that I heard from off the radio was the riveting Don’t Forbid Me (although I would not own a copy of this record for at least another 30 years).

During the next six years, I would assemble a batch of 45 singles and extended plays; and LPs, featuring both the top 40 moneymakers and selections that didn’t sell as well. Among the hits were There’s a Goldmine in the Sky; April Love, which is arguably one of his three finest; A Wonderful Time Up There; With the Wind and Rain in Your Hair; For My Good Fortune; I’m Walking the Floor Over You; Speedy Gonzalez; Dear John; etc.

There were also two LPs that perhaps weren’t mega sellers but, for me, are still worthy of the occasional spin – Star Dust, which is devoted to the classic Great American Songbook and has such standbys as Deep Purple; Ebb Tide; St. Louis Blues; Autumn Leaves, and the title song; and Hymns We Love, an album easily equal to the sacred music ones of George Beverly Shea and Tennessee Ernie Ford. Finally, Boone had the arrangements of the gifted Billy Vaughn.

The black label with the rainbow colored letters was also an attractive feature and a reason why I have gathered an array of 45s, LPs and one 78 by Dot artists from various rummage sales over the years, as well as specimens of the earlier maroon label. Part 5 next week!

Jim Hall

Concierto
CTI- ZK 65132, cd, recorded April 16 and 23, 1975.

Jim Hall

The very superb jazz guitarist, Jim Hall (1930-2013), brought together a who’s who of jazz talent to create one of a handful of truly beautiful, mellow and, most importantly, musically substantial albums to be heard anywhere. The standouts are trumpeter Chet Baker, who had almost a decade left of concerts and recordings before he self-destructed from his drug addictions at an Amsterdam hotel in 1988; alto saxist Paul Desmond, who died in 1977 from lung cancer but would especially be remembered for his over 15 years with the Dave Brubeck Quartet; and bassist Ron Carter, still alive and well at 80.

The gem in this program is the 20 minute Don Sebesky arrangement of Rodrigo’s already exquisite Guitar Concerto, one in which everyone in the group plays their heart out. Totally recommended and available for listening on youtube !!!

Roosevelt and Hopkins

An Intimate History
by Robert Sherwood; Harper and Brothers, 1948, 934 pages.

I am in the process of reading this magnum opus on Franklin Roosevelt’s closest personal advisor, Harry Hopkins (1890-1946 , who was pulled out of the New Deal bureaucracy to serve at the President’s beck and call for most of World War II. Whatever Hopkins lacked in any real background in the diplomatic or military spheres, which his boss supplied on a personal level, he made up in the intuition department- truly knowing when to speak and when not to, skills FDR prized above everything else. The President so valued Hopkins that he moved him and his family into a suite in the White House so as to have instant access.

The fascination of this relationship is written with storytelling prowess by Robert Sherwood, a playwright who served on Hopkins’s team and was a close friend. The inevitable panorama of five to six very tumultuous years in the White House, ones not matched since, are presented in a comprehensive manner. Many famous players such as Churchill, Stalin, and others; the endless intrigues; the horrific decisions and their context – are all served up in such a compulsively readable manner that may lead to at least a month of all-nighters!

SOLON & BEYOND, Week of November 16, 2017

Marilyn Rogers-Bull & Percyby Marilyn Rogers-Bull & Percy
grams29@tds.net
Solon, Maine 04979

Good morning, dear friends. Don’t worry, be happy!

The Solon Pine Tree 4-H Club met on November 11 for their second meeting of the new year. The members voted to adopt a family for Christmas. They also voted to bring items for the Skowhegan Animal Shelter to the December meeting. These would be community projects for next year.

Officers elected were; Cooper Dellarma, president; Hunter Souce, vice president; Laci Dickey, secretary; Desmond Robinson, assistant secretary; Devyn Deleonardis, treasurer; Jillian Robinson, assistant treasurer; Brooks Souce and Sarah Craig, flag bearers; and Macy Plourde and Autumn Ladd, assistant flag bearers.

The members are planning to have a Christmas Party at their December meeting

Leaders Lois Miller and Hallie Dellarma worked with the members making holiday wreaths.

Several members are planning to attend a Swag making workshop in Skowhegan on November 18.

The next meeting will be on Saturday, December 9, at 9:30 a.m., at the Solon Fire Station.

Recently, the annual Solon Pine Tree 4-H Club Family Supper was held at the Masonic Hall, in Solon, with many parents and members present, Lief and I were invited as honored guests. There were many wonderful choices at the buffet table and Lief and I were invited to start the line. It was such a warm and welcoming feeling to be included in this family affair.

Leader Eleanor Pooler passed out awards. The Solon Pine Tree Club received the Outstanding Club Award again this year.

Leaders who have been with this club the longest are Eleanor Pooler with 56 years, Rance Pooler for 46 years and Doris Dean for 35 years. My congratulations go out to them! And, my many thanks for always including me for the Family Supper.

Was very pleased to receive an e-mail from the Solon Municipal Clerk and Tax Collector’s Office with news to share about the recent voting on November 7. There was a total of 267 voters who got out that day. Question #1…45 Yes, 220 No and 2 Blank. Question #2…135 Yes, 130 No and 2 blank; Question #3, 169 Yes, 96 No and 2 blank and Question #4…135 Yes, 125 No and 7 blank.

Another great craft fair coming up this week is at the Redington-Fairview General Hospital Main and MOB lobbies, at 46 Fairview Avenue, in Skowhegan on Friday, November 17, from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Homemade crafts & goodies sponsored by the RFGH Auxiliary .

On October 18, Heidi Coffin from the Cromwell Center for Disabilities Awareness visited the Solon Elementary School to offer free programs for students in grades 1-5.

The Cromwell Center is a Maine nonprofit agency who offers disabilities awareness programs to build sensitivity and understanding, reduce bullying, and help create more inclusive schools and communities. The students learned that we all have strengths and challenges, that having a disability doesn’t define a person, and that they can help put an end to bullying of those with special needs.

The Solon School is having a Thanksgiving Food Drive November 6-17. Please send in donations of nonperishable food items to help the students in this community service project. Food will be donated to the Solon Thrift Shop Food Cupboard. This is sponsored by the Solon Kids Care Club.

On September 19 and October 4, Solon students and staff participated in the Walking School Bus Program. This activity is part of the school wellness plan.

Thanksgiving break at Solon Elementary will b November 22-26.

On November 18, from 5 – 7 p.m., Huntah’s Suppah at the Wellington VFW, 9 Parkman Rd., in Wellington. All you can eat! By donation To benefit the Wellington Church and Wellington Fire Department.

And now for Percy’s memoir, entitled The Way: A loving word, A cheerful smile, A kindly thought or two… A helping hand, A ready step, They help, my friend, they do. A patient heart, A thoughtful deed, A willingness to cheer… An endless day Of service, friend, These things make life most dear. Be kind, do good, Have loving thoughts Throughout the livelong day, Think right, serve God, Be friend to all, And you have found The Way! (words by Esther Nilsson).

PERFORMANCE DOG: Tracking opportunities in Maine

TRAINING YOUR PERFORMANCE DOGTRAINING YOUR PERFORMANCE DOG

by Carolyn Fuhrer

While indoor scent work is popular with many people and fun for dogs, if you have never had the opportunity to track in a real situation with your dog, you don’t know how much you are missing.

Just a few weeks ago at the end of October the Mid Coast Kennel Club of Maine put on a wonderful two-day tracking event. On Saturday, there were four TDU (Tracking Dog Urban) tests in Augusta and five TD (Tracking Dog) tests in the Somerville area. On Sunday, there were three TDX (Tracking Dog Excellent) tests in Somerville. Six dogs earned titles right here in Maine – three TD and three TDX.

Tracking is an excellent sport to watch and Mid Coast Kennel Club makes spectator participation a high priority. The spectators – called the “gallery” in tracking tests – are allowed to follow along the entire track and watch the action. There is a person in charge of the gallery and this person takes cues from the judges as to when the gallery can advance so as not to distract the dog. It is exciting to watch the dog solve various scent problems along the track and also an excellent way to learn more about tracking.

The TD (Tracking Dog) test takes place in a big field with basically uniform cover; the terrain can be hilly. The TDX (Tracking Dog Excellent) test takes place in a rural area. It can involve changes in cover, corn fields, woods, road crossing, small streams and rugged terrain. But this is not all tracking has to offer. The TDU (Tracking Dog Urban) test takes place in business parks, schools and college campuses. The test must be designed so any handler and dog can negotiate the test. The test can involve stairs. In this test, the handler must be 10 feet behind the dog on lead. The track starts on a vegetated surface. A small flag indicates the start with a scent article left by the tracklayer and a 30-yard flag indicates direction of the track. The team of dog and handler must follow the path the tracklayer walked and find an intermediate article dropped by the person and an article at the end of the track. The track must be 400 – 450 yards long and 10 percent – 30 percent of the track must cross non-vegetated surfaces such as sidewalks, small parking lots, roads, etc. It can go up ramps or stairs, along buildings, and must have three to five turns. The dog and handler work as a team. You may talk to your dog, rescent your dog, take a break and water your dog – the dog must follow the track and find the articles that were dropped. The handler must understand the dog’s indication of track or loss of track and encourage and help accordingly.

TDU is considered an entry level test. If you obtain a TDU, you are eligible for a much more difficult test – a VST. Here, dogs track again in an urban setting, but must negotiate turns on pavement, find three articles on the track and go a distance of 600-800 yards with four to seven turns. This track is three to five hours old (a TDU is 30 minutes to two hours old). Dogs in both these urban tests work in real life situations where they must negotiate traffic, parking lots, construction, people, children, playgrounds, and other real distractions that may occur in an urban setting. These tests are real, exciting and challenging and take place in actual real life environment – they require an excellent relationship based on teamwork, understanding and patience. Get real – get tracking!

Carolyn Fuhrer has earned over 100 AKC titles with her Golden Retrievers, including 10 TDX Titles and two Champion Tracker titles. Carolyn is the owner of North Star Dog Training School in Somerville, Maine. She has been teaching people to understand their dogs for over 25 years. You can contact her with questions, suggestions and ideas for her column by e-mailing carolyn@dogsatnorthstar.com.

Give Us Your Best Shot! Week of November 16, 2017

RARE VISIT: While working in her hayfield this past summer, Joan Chaffee, of Clinton, spotted this Eastern Red Tailed Hawk searching for a meal.

 

LEADING THE WAY: This momma mallard was seen leading her chicks this past summer by Michael Bilinsky, of China Village.

 

HAVE A SEAT: Davida Barter, of Skowhegan, saw these colorful tractor seats on display while driving along “The Airline” from Baileyville.

For Your Health – Surprising Perks Of Your Medicare Plan

For Your Health

(NAPSI)—With more than 10,000 baby boomers turning 65 each day, the number of people eligible for Medicare is growing rapidly. Medicare Open Enrollment starts Oct. 15 and runs through Dec. 7, a time when millions of people are evaluating their health plan options to ensure their coverage meets their retirement lifestyle.

When looking at Medicare plans, people check to make sure their physician is included in the plan’s network and prescriptions are covered, but it’s important to see which unique benefits and perks a plan offers to take full advantage of the program. There is much more than standard health care available.

Medicare plans can offer benefits including a free gym or fitness facility membership through programs such as SilverSneakers, the nation’s leading community fitness program designed specifically for older Americans. Exercise is key to helping people live their best lives as they age, maximizing their health and well-being to maintain an active lifestyle. No matter a person’s goal—from running a marathon for the first time to keeping up with grandkids—SilverSneakers members enjoy the many benefits of the program, including:

• Membership to more than 14,000 fitness locations: SilverSneakers members have unrestricted access and unlimited visits to every fitness and wellness facility in the national network, including each location’s basic amenities, such as weights, treadmills, pools and more.

• Specialized fitness classes: SilverSneakers offers a variety of classes in partnering locations that are designed to accommodate all fitness levels and interests. Led by certified SilverSneakers fitness instructors, classes range from SilverSneakers Classic and Splash, to SilverSneakers BOOM®, a fast-paced, higher-intensity class designed for baby boomers and active older adults.

• Friendship and community: So much more than an exercise program, SilverSneakers helps foster new friendships with a welcoming and supportive member community that becomes one of close friends.

• Quality of life: The program changes lives by engaging participants in physical activity to help them do more of what they love. In fact, 91 percent of members say SilverSneakers has improved their quality of life.

More than 14.5 million people are eligible for this program offered at no additional charge through the nation’s leading Medicare Advantage, Medicare Supplement and group retiree plans. You can check your Medicare plan to see if you are eligible for the program and claim your free fitness membership at www.silversneakers.com.

Update on birds

Roland D. HalleeSCORES & OUTDOORS

by Roland D. Hallee

As an update to my column of two weeks ago about the disappearance of birds from our backyard feeders, I have done some more research, and received some feedback from readers.

Through the dog days of August, it is not unusual to see and hear fewer birds. The nesting season has ended. So, young birds and their parents have dispersed and left their nesting territories (your yard). If natural food is plentiful, they are less likely to supplement their diet with your feeders. Migration has also started. Backyard birds with long migration routes will start leaving early in more northern areas of the country as insect populations start to fall off. Midday heat will make birds more inactive. Summer temperatures will often cause birds to be less active during the middle of the day. So, it’s possible that the warm fall we are experiencing has something to do with it. So, they won’t come to feeders as much.

“Things are going wrong with our environment,” writes John Terborgh, a James B. Duke Profesor of Environmental Science at Duke University. “Even the parts of it that are nominally protected. If we wait until all the answers are in, we may find ourselves in a much worse predicament than if we had taken notice of the problem earlier. By waiting, one risks being too late; on the other hand, there can be no such thing as being too early.”

For some interesting insight, read Terborgh’s book, Where Have All the Birds Gone?: Essays on the Biology and Conservation of Birds that Migrate to the American Tropics.

Is this talk about national bird declines just hot air? No. As well as all these apparent disappearances of birds, there has been a serious, countrywide, decline in the numbers of many birds, including many well known and loved species. This decline has been slow and gradual, rather than sudden. Extensive research has shown that these declines are caused primarily by changes in agriculture.

According to ArkWildlife, a respected online trading bird food and wildlife habitats company, and 24 years of history with a passion for garden wildlife, “don’t panic, nothing’s gone wrong. The birds are simply following the natural seasons, food availability and their natural behaviour. Perhaps somewhat surprisingly, birds can suffer real food shortages during the summer months at a time most vital to them – the breeding season. Wet weather or a late spring can all mean a lack of insects to forage for when the trees and hedgerows have long since been stripped of berries and seeds. So birds turn to our gardens in huge numbers to supplement their diet and even bring fledglings directly from the nest to the feeder.”

Although we don’t see it very often, there is a year-round cycle within the bird world. As we transition into fall, birds go into different feeding patterns.

Don’t worry, according to many bird research sources, they will come back. So don’t take down those feeders yet. Keep them filled, the birds will love you for it.

Here are a few responses we received on our website:

Janie says: It appears the loss of birds is quite widespread…not just in Maine. I live in upstate New York… Catskill Mountains region; and we haven’t had any birds, at all, for over a month. We went for about a 45 minute drive to admire the autumn foliage, and we did not see even one bird spotted flying during the drive… and we were specifically watching to see if another area had birds. My relatives and I feed them year round… and usually have to refill the feeders on a daily basis. There have always been lots of birds year round… this has not happened before in over the 25 years I have lived here. On a positive note, we noticed this weekend a few birds have started to return from wherever they had gone! It is so nice to hear and see them again!

JHM says: I have had a feeder in Waterville, Maine, for many years. The first few days in September the hummingbird sat at the nectar feeder almost all day and evidently left that night on his southern journey. Until about that date my seed feeder had many daily bird visits from tufted titmice, several male and female cardinals, many chickadees, gold finches and house finches, and others. But right about that time in early to mid-September I realized my feeder was staying full and there were no birds, only an occasional squirrel. I cleaned the feeder and bought new seeds, but still no luck. I kept a look out for predators and did see a cat several times. But, that is not unusual. I have seen an occasional titmouse and cardinal but that is it. I have seen some birds in the trees, but not as many as I have seen in the past. I hope they will come back as the birds are a bright spot by my kitchen window during the long winter.

Caroline says: I was just googling “where are the birds” and this article was high in the search. I live in Southport, North Carolina. Usually my feeders are covered with many types of birds, especially House finches. But for the last month or two, I have a couple of chickadees, cardinals and nuthatches. This area is rich in bird life, especially water birds (egrets, herons, etc) and those birds seem to be about the same. But I am very shocked at the decrease in feeder birds. We have a lot of insects here. I have noticed no decrease in them. I am very concerned to find an article from Maine that describes a similar situation.

I’m Just Curious: Really?

by Debbie Walker

I’m not sure how this “New Tiny Houses” thing came about; it has become the newest in home ownership. Newest? That’s my “really?” question.

Well, I don’t believe “new” should be included in the term. When I was driving home the other day I saw at least three “tiny houses.” These homes probably were not as fancy as the ones on that Sunday night TV show. However, it is a way for people to have a “home” and not pay rent. It has been going on for a long time.

We have a friend who built what he calls a “camp.” It is small and he works on it as he can afford it. The difference is some of the “tiny houses” are meant to travel, the ones on the way home were not, nor is our friend’s.

I know I am probably not seeing the whole picture but I am seeing some serious problems with moving some of these little “Tiny Houses” down the road. If they want to move around what is wrong with some of the travel trailers?

There are some beautiful “homes” (a home is whatever size and structure you are fond of). The trailers are built for going down the road, wherever your heart desires and to live in with comfort. Some are luxury and some are suited to a rugged camping experience. Storage is everywhere, inside and outside under the trailer. I believe with most companies you can do some customizing, my in-laws used to design their fifth wheel according to their (her!) needs.

I am kind of wondering if this “Tiny House” thing will last a long time. The TV show certainly will not have the run time of “Captain Kangaroo.” I lived in a travel trailer some years back, for a year, and I enjoyed it. We were in Florida and spent a lot of time outside. But even in “weather” we were comfortable. Ken and I spent at least three summers up here in our motor home. We did enjoy those summers even though Ken wasn’t quite as happy as I was contented.

Well anyway, that’s my rant about the “Tiny Houses.” Please don’t hesitate in letting me know your thoughts.

WEATHER

(Copied from The Old Farmers Almanac for Kids)

Little Girl’s Poem About Snow

Charley looked at the snowflakes fair,
Falling so swiftly through the air.
With wonder in her big blue eyes
She looked at the fairies from far-off skies.
Soon she called, “Momma, come look at these things,
Floating as softly as if they had wings
I guess, Momma, the angels up there
Are combing the dandruff out of their hair.

by Cora E Talbot (1865-1938)

With that cute little poem I am trying to build myself up for what is sure to come soon, after all this is Maine. Please contact me at dwdaffy@yahoo.com with questions or comments. Don’t forget to check out our website. Thanks for reading!