Any-deer permits now available

Roland D. HalleeSCORES & OUTDOORS

by Roland D. Hallee

This bit of news came across my desk this week, and I thought I would share it with you. According to Maine Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife, applications for 2017 any-deer (antlerless) permit lottery are now available online from the Maine Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife.

To apply online, visit www20.maine.gov/online/nedeer/. Online applications are due by 11:59 P.M. on August 15, 2017.

It is free to apply for the any-deer permit lottery. The drawing will be held on September 8, and results will be posted on the department’s website.

A total of 66,050 any-deer permits will be issued in 22 of the state’s 29 wildlife management districts. This is an increase from last year when there were 45,755 permits available to hunters. The permit allocation is: 16,517 for landowners; 16,517 for juniors; and 1,453 for Superpack holders and 31,563 for all other hunters.

The 22 wildlife management districts where any-deer (antlerless) permits will be issued are 2, 3, 6, 7, 8, 9, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27 and 29. This year, permits have been allocated to districts 7, 12, and 13 as biological data collected and field observations by staff suggest that these WMD’s have experienced population growth.

The department uses the any-deer permit system to manage the white-tailed deer population in the state. The ability to enact change in the state’s deer populations derives from the ability to increase, or decrease, the number of breeding female deer on the landscape. By controlling the harvest of female deer in the 29 regional wildlife management districts throughout the state, biologists can manage population trends.

With last year’s winter below average in severity, more permits can be issued. White-tailed deer are at the northern edge of their range in Maine, and winter severity is a limiting factor concerning population growth. The 2015-16 winter proved to be mild in nature, in fact it turned out to be one of the mildest in the last 60+ years which often results in an increase in the deer population. To offset potential population increases due to increased juvenile survival, MDIFW increased Any-deer permit (ADP) allocations by approximately 60 percent (45,755) from the 2015 allocation of 28,770.

Last deer season, Maine hunters harvested 23,512 deer, representing an increase of 16 percent from the 2015 deer harvest. There were 20,040 deer tagged during the general firearms season, 1,267 deer were harvested during the expanded archery season, 469 deer were tagged during the regular archery season and Maine’s youth hunters harvested 659 deer. Muzzleloaders tagged 933 deer.

Deer hunting season (firearms) begins with Youth Deer Hunting Day on Saturday, October 21. Youth may take a buck statewide or an antlerless deer only in the wildlife management districts where any-deer permits will be issued this fall.

This year, Maine Residents Only Day is on Saturday, October 28, and regular firearms season for deer runs October 30 through November 25. Note: this year, a nonresident who owns 25 or more acres of land in Maine and leaves land open to hunting, holds a valid hunting license, and is not otherwise prohibited by law, may hunt deer on the resident only day.

For more information, visit www.mefishwildlife.com.

I’m Just Curious: T-shirt sayings and wisdom

by Debbie Walker

I guess by now you know that I will read most anything. I’m just curious about your interests (oops, you are reading this column!) It was said of a friend of mine that she would read toilet paper if it had words on it.

I do enjoy reading a lot of different subjects and tonight it has been ads for T-shirts with different sayings on them. So… the T-shirt sayings are pretty funny. The following ones came from a catalog called “Things You Never Knew”:

• I may have the right to remain silent… but I don’t have the ability.

• I try to take one day at a time but sometimes several days attack me all at once!

• Not sure if I washed the spider down the drain in my shower or if he took one look at me naked and then leaped willingly to his death!

• People who Tolerate me on a daily basis…they are the real heroes! (Yup Ken is my hero)

• Don’t let my motorcycle ride interfere with the safety of your phone call! (Please be careful about motorcycles)

• Don’t follow in my footsteps…I think I stepped in something!

• I should be ashamed of my behavior, let’s be clear here I’m not but I should be. (I have too much fun!)

• You know that little voice inside your head that keeps you from saying things you shouldn’t? I should probably get one of those.

• Let’s stop sending money to other countries and let them hate us for free!

• I don’t do drugs and I don’t drink, at my age I can get the same effect by standing too fast!

• People should seriously stop expecting normal from me … we all know it’s never gonna happen! (I do think most of my friends and family have stopped expecting normal from me!)

• When is this “Old Enough to Know Better” supposed to kick in?

• Why is it I can remember the lyrics to my favorite song in high school 20 years later, BUT I can’t remember why I came to the kitchen? (that’s a daily happening thing around here.)

• IF you don’t have to give up your car because others drive drunk with theirs … Then why do you have to give up your gun because others commit crimes with theirs?

• Note to self…Wearing headphones doesn’t make my farts silent!!

• Have you hugged an idiot today? Me neither, come here.

• Respect Your Elders; they graduated school without the internet!

• I just did a week’s worth of Cardio after walking into a spider web!

• I thought growing old would take longer!

• I plan on living forever, so far so good!

• Give me one good reason to act my age!

• Common sense, so rare it’s kind of a superpower.

• Prayer is the best way to meet the Lord BUT messing with my daughter is faster!

There are so many more sayings, and this is just three pages of them! I hope they gave you a giggle or two or three. I’m just curious what your favorite would be! So… contact me at dwdaffy@yahoo.com sub: T-shirts.

Once again, thank you for reading.

REVIEWS: Singer: Eddy Howard; Composer: Vivaldi; Opera singer: Igor Gorin

Peter Catesby Peter Cates

Eddy Howard

My Best to You; My Last Goodbye

Eddy Howard

Mercury C-30053X45, seven-inch 45 vinyl disc, recorded March 13, 1958.

The very gifted singer/bandleader, Eddy Howard, died of a cerebral hemorrhage in his sleep during the night of May 23, 1963, at the very young age of 48. I have written about him before in these pages and will simply state that his 78s, 45s and LPs of ballads and easy tempo love songs still give me great pleasure, upon re-hearing. The wistful My Last Goodbye and the effusive My Best to You, a re-recording of a 1946 hit, are wonderful examples of what could be described as romantic, late ‘40s to ‘50s pop with touches of real blues.

Vivaldi

The Four Seasons

Vivaldi

Corelli: Concerto Grosso No. 8, in G Minor, “Christmas Concerto”; Pergolesi: Flute Concerto No. 2 in D Major- Karl Munchinger conducting the Stuttgart Chamber Orchestra and Werner Krotzinger, violin, for Vivaldi; Jean-Pierre Rampal, flute, for Pergolesi; London Treasury Weekend Classics, 417-873-4, recorded 1971, 1961, 1964.

Karl Munchinger (1915-1990) founded the Stuttgart Chamber Orchestra just after World War II and led it for just over 40 years, retiring in 1988. I have enjoyed every record of his that I have heard, if not own. These three works are given spirited performances that will give much pleasure to both newcomers to classical music and to seasoned collectors! This recording of Vivaldi’s Seasons is the second of three for London that the Maestro did, each one with a different fiddler. I own the early fifties mono lp, along with the above, which I like better by a tiny margin because of more rhythmic bite.

Igor Gorin

Largo Al Factotum

Igor Gorin, baritone, with orchestra conducted by Howard Barlow; Ol’ Moses Put Pharoah in His Place- Fred Waring and his Pennsylvanians; V Disc, no. 563, 12-inch vinyl 78 record, probably recorded during World War II.

Igor Gorin

Igor Gorin (1904-1982) was a popular opera and concert singer on radio during the mid ‘30s throughout the ‘40s and recorded 78s for Victor, starting in 1936. His singing on side 1 of the above record of Rossini’s most famous opera aria is quite good, with a fine accompaniment by an orchestra under the conducting of Howard Barlow, Music Director of the CBS Radio Orchestra from 1927 to 1943.

Side two has the Pennsylvanians under their founder and leader, Fred Waring (1900-1984), giving a most festive rendition of the spiritual Ol’ Moses…, itself of average quality. However, I do own a sizable number of the group’s records for Victor, Decca, Capitol and Reprise; at one point in the forties and fifties, it was the most popular choir in the U.S. and former President Dwight Eisenhower watched its TV show every Sunday night, without missing one episode.

The V Disc label provided records for broadcast over armed forces radio stations and several of them are in my collection.

NEWS FROM THE VA, Week of July 27, 2017

Gary Kennedyby Gary Kennedy

This is the era of the realization of the value of the commitment of our men and women in uniform and those who have retired their uniforms. There has been no more advantageous time in our history to seek benefit befitting the sacrifices that our defenders have given. “Thank you for your service” is heard by so many veterans today but only recently has this been equated to an actual, tangible benefit in the lives of those who have been willing to sacrifice all so that we remain Americans and enjoy the freedom that so many countries around the world don’t enjoy.

An example that I am familiar with is our “Blue Water Navy,” which were navy ships anchored or patrolling off the shores of Vietnam while defoliates (Agent Orange) were being sprayed over the country side to kill the vegetation so the enemy would be exposed. For approximately 40 years the government denied any relationship between these chemicals and the diseases that our military succumbed to. Our government took the stand that the chemical only involved the soldier that had “boots on the ground.” Now because of great advocacy by our veteran advocates and political leaders such as Senator Olympia Snowe and current Senator Susan Collins most of these issues are being treated as service connected and compensated.

All states have great advocacy groups such as Disabled American Veterans, American Legion, Veterans of Foreign Wars and the Bureau of Veterans Affairs. Also there are some independent advocates that work behind the scenes. Here in Maine our advocates are located, for the most part, at the Veteran’s Administration, Togus, Maine. Their phone number is 207-623-8411 if you would like to contact someone.

I would be remiss in my reporting if I didn’t mention the #1 affliction to especially combat veterans, although there are other military personnel that have this problem for other reasons, P.T.S.D.. (Post Traumatic Stress Disorder). For many years this was the most difficult problem for which to receive help. However, recently there has been a push to take a closer look. This new attitude has resulted in many previous denials to now be acknowledged as accepted and those thousands of veterans who once were lost are now found and are receiving the help they need. So, if you are one that was denied in past years it might be advantageous to visit your VA center once again.

There are so many things that have changed in the VA system that benefits our veterans. It is well worth the time to visit the VA and speak with a veteran’s advocate or service officer. They have a wealth of knowledge and can steer you in the right direction. I have written/developed cases for more than 35 years and can assure you that things are very user friendly these days.

This is the time of year that we salute our men and women in uniform and pay our respects to those who have given their all. It’s a time to think about all the dreams and aspirations that have been ripped away, never to be realized. Just think about it for a moment. Perhaps one of your friends, family or ancestors made the supreme sacrifice. What would they have achieved had they lived? We’ll never know but we have so much opportunity because of their sacrifice.

I have traveled this world and have seen so many people who have looked at me with longing. It’s not because I am great to look at, it’s that I am an American and they can see the freedom in my face, what I am allowed to do and where I am allowed to go. Most observers in the third world can only dream of having that kind of freedom. I have learned that my being an American is precious and worth any price that I have ever had to pay. It’s a fact that some take freedom for granted every day; that is just the way it is. However, when you pass a veterans cemetery, you will start to realize that your freedom isn’t really free at all. Someone paid a very big price for that. Take care and God Bless America.

IF WALLS COULD TALK, Week of July 27, 2017

Katie Ouilette Wallsby Katie Ouilette

WALLS, remember when you wrote and told our faithful readers about how our governor has hoped that products would be made in Maine and sold in other areas of our
United States and you talked about my step-sons selling yachts that are built in both Rockland and Raymond, to Washington State enthusiasts? Well, step-son Dean happened to have a Business Pulse magazine in his luggage when arriving for a visit a couple weeks ago and there was a photo of Dean on the cover! The caption says that No. 81on the top 100 list is Bellingham Yacht Sales.

Are dad Lew and step-mom Katie proud? Well, there is a photo of Nick and Dean standing in front of a Maine-made yacht and the two Ouilette brothers have been standing through the ‘thick and thin’ of a growing business for 33 years. What’s more, business has grown to their opening another office in Everett, Washington, (about an hour down the road from Bellingham).

Now, WALLS, you’ve made the announcement about Bellingham Yacht Sales and Service, but surely you have a lot to say about the family’s (yes, almost the whole family) visiting family members who have a cottage on Pattie Pond, in Winslow, and Lake Wesserunsett, in East Madison. Nick and Dean talked of memories of attending Madison schools and graduating from Madison High School, while Dean’s daughter, Michelle, and her brother, Matt, were also students in Madison as Bellingham Sales and Charters grew. Now, Matt is busy with yacht sales and service and his wife, Heather, is important to the hotel business in Bellingham and mother of Olive and Frances.

Michelle is married to Jason, teaches in Bellingham and is also a busy mom to Kinley and Caden. Oh, WALLS, did you mention that everyone has visited family in Winslow and East Madison and Brittany and her “Bella” are so happy that daddy Chad came along, too. (And a bit of an aside here. Brittany and Chad named their baby girl Arabella Joyce and we are so glad that the grandma who left us years ago, is still remembered.

Yes, we are thrilled that Michelle’s Jason and Brittany’s Chad are truly wonderful additions to the family and really great daddies to our families ‘wee ones’ and ‘little ones’.

Before placing the last “period” at the end, I must tell you about the gathering that daughter Lynn and Chuck hosted on July 22. About 60 wonderful friends gathered at Lynn’s new home in East Madison to celebrate Lew’s and my July birthdays and our 40 years of marriage. Yes, second marriages for each, but how fortunate we are that our kids thought we’d be perfect parents for each one. So now you all know the story of the wonderful family that we truly enjoy, whether in Maine or Washington State …and that is why Katie and Lew proudly point to the greats and grands on their refrigerator door.

SOLON & BEYOND, Week of July 27, 2017

Marilyn Rogers-Bull & Percyby Marilyn Rogers-Bull & Percy
grams29@tds.net
Solon, Maine 04979

Good morning, dear friends. Don’t worry, be happy!

The Solon Alumni Association met on July 15 at the Solon Elementary School for their annual meeting with 65 members and guests present. The class of 1967 celebrated their 50th year with eight members present. The ones from that class who attended were Michael Bishop, Gary Farnham, Cheryl Hanson Edgecomb, William McDon­ough, Dorothy Padham Dunphy, Eunice Waugh Kenn, Brenda Whitney Padham and Brent Brown, who traveled from California to attend this important occasion.

Others who celebrated were Alice Davis Heald, 77th class, Arlene Davis Meader and Albert Starbird 76th, Mary Bishop Heald, 75th, and Theona Brann Lagasse 70th.

The reunion was catered by the Solon Pine Tree 4-H Club under the leadership of Eleanor Pooler.

There was a $25 door prize won by Arlene Meader and she donated it back to the scholarship fund.

An auction was held and $753 was raised for the scholarship fund.

In the column that I wrote about the upcoming alumni meeting that didn’t make it to the paper it mentions the ones who had lived in Solon and graduated from the high school, who had died, and they were: Norris Padham, class of 1943, Connie Coombs Hopkins, class of 1950, Jack McCarty, class of 1951, Partricia Tolman Reed, class of 1956, Harold Wood, class of 1963, Colby Waugh, class of 1969 and also Ray Greenlaw.

The Embden Historical Society will be having its annual cookout/potluck meal on Monday, July 31. Social time is at 4:30 p.m.; meal at 5 p.m. If you plan to come bring a casserole, salad, bread, pickles or dessert. Drinks, plates and plastic ware will be provided. It will be held at the Moore camp at 4 Fern Drive on the West side of Embden Lake, located 2.7 miles from the fork in the road of the Embden Pond Road and Cross Town Road.

Received the following in an e-mail from Somerset Woods Trustees: “If you have already been helping build the new trails at Coburn Woods, thank you. If you haven’t or are ready to do more, here’s another opportunity. The trail system, designed by Brian Alexander, will be built for mountain bikes but hikers will also enjoy the new trails winding through the woods. Once completed, we believe this will be the longest mountain bike trail in Somerset County!

Percy welcomed his many compliments received from the friends he made through our column and leaves you with this thought in his memoir this week:

“The glory of friendship is not the outstretched hand, nor the kindly smile, nor the joy of companionship; it is the spiritual inspiration that comes to one when you discover that someone else believes in you and is willing to trust you with a friendship.” (words by Ralph Waldo Emerson).

The Internet: At War with Itself

ERIC’S TECH TALK

by Eric Austin
Computer Technical Advisor

There’s a war going on, although you might not be aware of it. It’s a war between the almighty dollar and the information superhighway.

I began my career in the early ‘90s, just as the internet-fueled tech boom was taking off. I’ve watched the internet grow from a tiny seed in the mind of Al Gore (ha ha) to the social and economic juggernaut that it is today.

But even from its very inception there were two competing ideas fighting to shape its future. One was an outgrowth of a cultural groupthink: the “hippie” movement of the internet, if you will. It’s an apt comparison, as the philosophy it inspired hearkens back to that optimistic era of peace and love.

This group believed the internet was a chance for humans to reinvent themselves. To escape the shackles of corporatism and Gordon Gekko-greed that had defined the previous decade of the 1980s.

The phrase “information wants to be free” defined this school of thought.

The “open-source” software movement, based on the idea of collaborative genius — that a group of unfettered minds could create something greater than any of its individual parts — gave birth to the Linux operating system, Firefox browser, VLC Media Player, GIMP and many other software programs. Each of us benefits from this movement whenever we download free software distributed under the GNU General Public Software License. And while it’s still only a sliver of the desktop market in comparison to Microsoft Windows, Linux dominates on mobile devices (56 percent) and powers more than 40 percent of the world’s web servers.

You can see the influence of this collaborative philosophy everywhere on the internet, and the world wide web is a better place because of it.

But there is another entity on the internet. A menacing, dark presence that wants to swallow up the hope and optimism of the free information movement. This force seeks to monetize and control the avenues of free access which the internet currently fosters. Rather than bettering society through collaborative social effort, this capitalist creature wants to conquer in the name of cold hard cash. It wants to turn the internet superhighway into a toll road.

This shadow over the internet is cast by ISPs, digital distribution giants and communication companies seeking to cement their dominance over their respective consumer markets.

The debate over Net Neutrality is the most recent battle to be waged in the war of $$ vs WWW. It promises to provide greater stability, consistency and service, but takes away freedom, ingenuity and the unexpected.

I’m here to tell you this is a war we need. It’s one of the good wars. This struggle is what keeps corporate greed on its toes. It leaves room for small start-ups to make an unexpected splash, and keeps established familiars from becoming complacent – yet provides the structure and efficiency that stimulates growth.

Without one we wouldn’t have great services like Netflix and Amazon. But without the other, great services like Netflix and Amazon never would have gotten the chance.

Net Neutrality must be retained because it levels the playing field. It doesn’t prevent bullies on the playground, but it makes sure everyone has a fighting chance.

Support Net Neutrality, not because it’s the right thing to do — even though it is. Support it because without the conflict it creates we wouldn’t have the dynamic technical environment that we’ve enjoyed for the last 20 years.

This is one time when conflict is good. Besides, it frustrates the corporate overlords.

Good. Keep them frustrated.

Get involved! Visit goFCCyourself.com and join almost 11 million other Americans who have left comments with the FCC in support of Net Neutrality.

10 plants you should be growing in your garden (part 2)

Emily CatesGARDEN WORKS

by Emily Cates

Click here to read part 1!

Part 2 of 2

Okra. Artichokes. Celery. Squash. Melons. How do these wonderful words make you feel? Do you imagine yourself with a scrumptious bowl of gumbo, a savory dip, a crunchy snack, a versatile side dish, or an ambrosial dessert? All of these mouth-watering dishes can be made from ingredients grown in your very own garden. With a little care, these veggies can bring much delight to your dinner table. In this article, we will conclude our short series on warm-weather plants that would be happy to grow in the garden now, looking at a few helpful hints and suggested varieties mentioned at the intro.

Let’s start off by taking a peek at okra. These good-looking plants with their lovely flowers are reminiscent of hollyhocks, rose-of-Sharon, mallow, and hibiscus. Some varieties are knee-high, while others reach a few feet higher toward the sky. They are cultivated for their cowhorn-shaped green seed pods which are harvested when about thumb-sized. These pods cook up slimy, but are beloved by many folks as the ingredient that makes legendary soups, and for their high nutrient content. Okra likes hot weather, moisture, plenty of room (planted 2′ or so between plants), and a loamy, weed-free soil with well-rotted manure mixed in. Named cultivars worth trying include ‘Clemson Spineless,’ ‘Star of David,’ and ‘Red Burgundy’- which sports beautiful red-hued pods. Start indoors in peat pots and set out four to five weeks later, after all danger of frost has passed – or direct seed into warm soil.

Artichokes are actually a kind of thistle whose unopened flower buds are harvested and prepared as food. Their cultivation results in a tasty treat for the veggie connoisseur. If you’re new to them and wonder how to prepare, cook, and eat them, here’s a helpful link: http://www.simplyrecipes.com/recipes/how_to_cook_and_eat_an_artichoke/.

Since they can be tricky to germinate, I would recommend finding a preferred source of transplants. Set out into IRT black plastic into good soil, feed heavily, and keep watered but not waterlogged. Provide lots of space, about 10sq. ft. per plant. Harvest before buds begin to open, and enjoy!

Celery is a plant that rewards the patient gardener with crisp, delightfully-flavored stalks. Some forms – such as celeriac, are grown for their fleshy root that is a European favorite in stews – and cutting celery for its bold-flavored leaves. Even the seeds are used to flavor savory dishes, especially in Eastern cuisines. Celery plants are slow to mature and might need a little extra care, but are worth growing. Start indoors in March and set outside when apple blossoms fall from the tree. Grow in rich soil, and be sure not to let the plants dry out at all at any time. Light autumn frosts are tolerated, but not any colder than that. Celery grown for its stalk will benefit from being blanched- that is, having something like plain cardboard wrapped and gently secured around the plant to keep it light-colored and mild-flavored. Look for the varieties ‘Brillant’ (celeriac), ‘Diamante’ (celeriac), ‘Par-Cel’ (cutting) and ‘Giant Red’ (a beautiful red-colored celery).

Squash, along with corn and beans, is an integral part of the “Three Sisters,” an essential trio of crops that sustained indigenous peoples in the Americas for centuries. They are highly variable and extend the whole rainbow of colors, shapes, sizes, and flavors. Some squash are completely boring, bland, and tasteless, while others are absolutely exciting, flavorful, and delicious. Grow the right ones in the right spot, and you will never forget their potential. Pumpkins, which are in essence the same as squash, are primarily grown as ornamentals and for livestock fodder in many places. However, a few pumpkin varieties make some of the best pies and pickles in all the land, and others are grown for their hull-less “naked” seeds that are delicious as a snack. Squash and pumpkins are heavy feeders and will grow very happily on a manure or compost pile. Bush types can be grown in relatively small spaces, while varieties with long, rambling vines will reach from one end of the yard to the other, and even climb trees!

They love warm weather and can be started a week or two early and set out before the second set of true leaves have appeared (be careful not to disturb the roots), or direct-seeded into warm soil. There are so many varieties to choose from, a delightful dilemma indeed. They range from delectably sweet hubbard, buttercup, and butternut varieties to more mildly-flavored summer squash and zucchini. Cultivars of note are: ‘Gele Reuzen'(pickling, possibly the same as ‘Jaune Gros de Paris’), ‘Burpee’s Butterbush’ (butternut for small spaces), Sweet Mama’ (buttercup), ‘Sweet Dumpling’ (my favorite!), ‘Zeppelin Delicata’ (another favorite!), ‘Carnival’ (beautiful, delicious acorn type), ‘Blue Hubbard’ (sweet and large), ‘Styrian'(naked seeds), ‘Long Pie Pumpkin’ (the best pies), ‘Dill’s Atlantic Giant'(giant pumpkin!), ‘Spaghetti'(spaghetti squash), ‘Benning’s Green Tint Patty Pan’ (unique scalloped good-tasting summer squash), and ‘Costata Romanesca’ (heirloom delectable large zucchini).

We’ll conclude this article by focusing on melons, ambrosia on a vine. Whether we’re growing the honeydew, cantaloupe, or other types like these, or the familiar watermelon or unfamiliar citron melon, they will all cause applause if they are a success. What else can we grow that makes us sit starry-eyed in the garden in the hot part of the day, stuffing our faces with sweet, juicy, refreshing fruits, with no regard for the juice running down our chins and onto our shirts?

Personally, I believe melons are one of the yummiest fruits you can grow. Give them full sun and similar soil as you would squash, but grow them in black plastic IRT mulch under agricultural fabric row covers to enhance success. The IRT mulch will provide additional heat units, and the row cover will protect against cucumber beetles and other pests – just be sure to uncover the plants during pollination. Like squash, they can be started early in peat pots to get a jump on the season, though direct-seeding is fine if the soil is warm. Here’s a few cultivars to look for: ‘Hannah’s Choice’ (muskmelon), ‘Golden Gopher’ (open-pollinated muskmelon), ‘Blacktail Mountain’ (watermelon for short seasons), ‘Cream of Saskatchewan’ (small fruits, cream-colored incredibly delicious flesh, thin rind, my favorite watermelon!), ‘Moon and Stars’ (unique spotted watermelon), ‘Orangeglo’ (orange-fleshed watermelon), ‘Peace’ (yellow-fleshed watermelon), ‘Sorbet Swirl’ (multicolor-fleshed watermelon), ‘Sugar Baby’ (old reliable standby, icebox-type watermelon). Citron melon is a kind of watermelon that is not sweet and is used to make candied citron. It is fairly uncommon, but you can find seeds and a recipe in the Sand Hill Preservation catalog.

Actually, most of the seeds mentioned in this article can be found there, or check out FEDCO, Johnny’s, Pinetree, Baker Creek, Territorial, or other seed companies that offer seeds for our climate. Happy planting, enjoy your garden!

Faked out again by similar looking insects

Roland D. HalleeSCORES & OUTDOORS

by Roland D. Hallee

From time to time, it happens. You see something unusual, don’t know what it is, so you go to your research material to find the answer. You use multiple sources, do your homework, then, when you think you have found the answer, it ends up being wrong.

Well, it happened again last weekend for me. While working in my garden at camp, I noticed this unusual looking dragonfly. It wasn’t your run-of-the-mill, old brown ugly dragonfly. It was extremely colorful and just seemed out of place.

Graphic Flutterer Internet photo

My research pointed to it being a Graphic Flutterer, rhyothemis graphiptera, The photo looked remarkably similar to the photo I had taken, but there was one thing that didn’t add up. The Graphic Flutterer can only be found in Australia, the Moluccas, New Guinea and New Caledonia. That’s half way around the world from here.

So, like I have done many times before, I turned to my contact, a wildlife biologist at the Maine Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife, emailed the photo to him, and he responded in short order.

“This is a Halloween Pennant,” (no, not a little flag you would wave on October 31), “Celithemis eponina. This is a native dragonfly in Maine, an uncommon, but not rare, species that breeds in slow streams, ponds, and lakes with abundant aquatic vegetation.”

Well, it sure fits. If you have been to Webber Pond, in Vassalboro, in recent years you will see that the lake is abundant with aquatic vegetation.

The Halloween pennant can be found across the eastern United States, ranging from the east coast to the states just east of the Rocky Mountains. They can also be found on some Caribbean islands and in Ontario province, in Canada. Seen mostly during June and July during the summer, they are actually active year round.

The Halloween pennant gets its name from its orange-colored wings, which have dark brown bands. They are often found on tips of vegetation near the edges of waterways. Mine was just hanging around on a Tiki torch near my garden.

It is a medium-sized dragonfly but also considered large for its species. They can range from 1-1/2 to 1-3/4 inches in length.

Halloween Pennant
Photo by Roland D. Hallee

The adults fly around above freshwater habitat and the surrounding vegetation, and feed on smaller insects they capture in flight. They are considered very strong flyers, and can fly during rain and strong winds.

And, listen to this, they have some positive impact: They help control the mosquito population and have no negative effect on humans. I can only hope I see more of them, considering the healthy mosquito population we have at camp. We feed them well.

They are also secure in numbers and currently have no conservation concerns, according to the International Union for Conservation of Nature.

In case you’re interested, dragonflies have been in existence since the Permian period (299 – 251 million years ago).

In the end, I was not too far off when I identified it as a Graphic Flutterer. According to the Animal Diversity Web, at the University of Michigan Museum of Zoology, the male Halloween Pennant closely resembles the Graphic Flutterer (take a look at the accompanying photos).

I’m Just Curious: Southern remedies

by Debbie Walker

You know by now that I have a love for odd, not the normal (?) books. I can’t help it, some of them are just so amusing and some have amazing information.

This past trip to the south (two weeks ago) offered me some very good pickins’ for books. One book I had to have is titled Thangs YANKEES Don’t Know, by Bil Dwyer. By the title you can tell the south is still blistered by the fact they lost THE war.

In this very southern book I found the section of “Rustic Remedies.” The author does give a note of warning and does suggest you should talk to your medical professional before trying any such remedies. Here are a few for you to contemplate:

Arthritis – Drink a mixture of honey, vinegar and moonshine. (Any wonder how this one works!)

Athlete’s Foot – Step in fresh cow dung (sure I’ll get right over to the neighbor’s pasture!)

Burns – Scrapings from a raw potato will draw out the fire. (I’ll bet that one works.)

Colds – Drink whiskey and honey mixed or a mixture of honey and vinegar. (Throw in some moonshine and fix your arthritis and the cold!)

Pneumonia – Give patient two teaspoonful of oil rendered from skunk fat. (Sure and they would have this at our nearest pharmacy?)

Sores – Put a little lard around the sore and let the dog lick it. The dog’s saliva will cure it.

Stop bleeding – Use chimney soot or spider webs. (A friend’s mom actually did that spider web thing on him and it worked. She also used black pepper to stop bleeding.)

Warts – Rub a clove of garlic on it every day or rub the wart with a rock and put the rock in a box. The person who opens the box will get the wart (!!!!). (Another friend of mine used clear nail polish. That one actually worked!)

Chicken pox – Can be relieved by letting a rooster fly over their head. (!!!)

Corn – To remove corn, rub it with a grain of corn, then feed the corn to a black chicken.

Cramps – If your toes cramp put your shoes upside down under your bed. (I have to tell Ken that one!)

Earache – Fried onion juice poured in the ear or persimmon sap. (Oh yuck!!)

Whooping cough – Get rid of this malady by getting a stick as long as you are and throwing it into the attic. (???)

Dizzy spells – Mixture of blackberry juice and moonshine (how do they think they got dizzy? That moonshine would be my guess!)

I know you probably have a few of these ingredients on your grocery list right now so you can be prepared! All the credit for collecting this information goes to the author Bil Dwyer and I have enjoyed sharing all this with you. Hope it gave you a chuckle or two!

And I will always be curious! Contact me at dwdaffy@yahoo.com sub line: southern remedies.

Thanks for reading!