Week of February 2, 2017

Week of February 2, 2017

[avia_codeblock_placeholder uid="0"]

Give Us Your Best Shot! (compilation) Week of February 2, 2017

Catching up on Your Best Shots:
Local camera buffs submitted many good photos in 2016

Pat Clark, in Palermo, captured this raven in a tree behind her home.

 

Betty Dunton, of Gardiner, took this foliage photo last fall.

 

Susan Lohnes, of China, took this photo in Canmore, Alberta, Canada.

 

Emily Poulin, of China, photographed these water droplets on a spider web.

 

Tina Richard, of Clinton, snapped this female hummingbird on a branch.

 

Eric Austin, of China, captured this beautiful sunset last fall.

 

David Bolduc, of Waterville, snapped this trestle of flowers last summer.

 

Susie True, of Chelsea, caught this chipmunk eating some jelly.

 

Bob Poulin, of Winslow, snapped this chipmunk playing hide-and-seek from a rain downspout.

Hitting the mat in Winslow

Winslow Youth Wrestling team member Ben Ireland, 9, of Sidney, wrestles at the Raider Rumble Tournament on Jan. 29

 

Noah Young, 9, of Fairfield in action at the tournament.

 

Winslow wrestler Troy Hachey, right, 11, of Sidney, battles with Skowhegan team member Caden Trask, 12, from Oakland.

Photos by Mark Huard,
owner Central Maine Photography

Groundhog says six more weeks of winter…maybe

Roland D. Halleeby Roland D. Hallee

Well, it’s Wednesday, February 1, the next issue of The Town Line is due to hit the streets tomorrow, and my deadline is fast approaching. Tomorrow is Groundhog day and I have not yet visited by little friend, Woodrow Charles, the weather prognosticating groundhog. So, I dressed and headed out. Fortunately, there isn’t very much snow on the ground, but a light snow was falling. The footing was not all that great. The rain has frozen the snow and it was a little slippery.

I finally reached the woodchuck’s lair, and like every year for the last 13 years, smoke is billowing from the chimney, and lights are on inside.

Instantly, I realized, since a woodchuck can live up to eight years, that would make Woody about 144 years old in human years. Amazing!”

I knock on the door, and Woody answered quickly.

“Come on in,” he said.

I noticed a suitcase near the door. “Going somewhere?” I asked, not expecting an answer.

“Headed to Houston.”

“What’s in Houston?”

“Super Bowl, my boy,” he responded. “I’m meeting some prairie dog cousins for the big game.”

“I thought they built a wall to keep you guys out,” I inquired.

“They can contain us, but they can’t stop us. We’re gonna tunnel under it.”

“Do you know anything about football?”

“I know that the Patriots and the Falcons’ offenses are comparable, but the Patriots’ defense is superior. It doesn’t matter that Atlanta has the No. 1 rated offense. Remember the St. Louis Rams’ vaunted “greatest show on turf” offense? Where did that get them? The Patriots held them to 17 points in 2002.”

“So, do you have a prediction?” I asked.

“Yes. Patriots 34-27.”

“No, no,” I interjected. “I’m talking about the rest of the winter. It is Groundhog Day,” I retorted.

“It’s getting more difficult to predict the weather with the way things have gone over the last 30 – 35 years,” Woody responded.

“What do you mean by that,” as I tried to pin him down for more information.

“The winters don’t seem to be as harsh.”

“So, you’re saying that climate change exists.”

“You’d have to be an idiot if you don’t think so,” he darted back.

I pushed further. “And you have the evidence to back that up, that climate change exists.”

“I wouldn’t exactly say that. Just call it alternate facts,” he replied.

“You mean like fake news,” I asked.

“Something like that,” he answered.

“So, do you have a prediction, and I don’t mean the Super Bowl.”

“Okay, okay, if you insist. I have been checking my equipment, although I know you don’t believe me. I do have another life, you know.”

“I have an obligation to my readers,” I tried to convince him. “They deserve it.”

“All my science seems to point to coldest temperatures in early to mid-February and early March, with the snowiest period in mid-February and into early and mid-March.”

“Sounds to me like March will come in like a lion, meaning it will go out like a lamb,” I summized.

“You can say that,” he replied. “But I’m going to come to the conclusion that we’re looking at six more weeks of winter, although maybe not harsh,” Woody answered.

At first I was going to debate it with him, based on the information I gathered from Mother Nature’s other weather forecasters last fall, but I couldn’t really argue with him. He has been right 85 percent of the time.

KHS presents Forts Along the Kennebec

From 1676 and into the 18th century, much of Maine, including the Kennebec River region, was abandoned by the English due to a series of colonial Indian wars.

In 1713, the Treaty of Utrecht afforded a sufficient promise of peace for settlers to return to the frontier of Maine. The lands along the Kennebec were owned by various groups of proprietors who wished to sell these lands to settlers. To secure the frontier and more importantly make the settlers feel secure, a series of four forts were built along the Kennebec between 1720 and 1754. This talk will discuss the history and archaeology of these forts.

Leon (Lee) Cranmer, the speaker, is an historical archaeologist who retired in August 2010 from the staff of the Maine Historic Preservation Commission. He has a BS from Stockton University, and a BA in anthropology and MA in history/historical archaeology from the University of Maine. Lee has worked in archaeology in Maine for almost 30 years and has conducted archaeology for the state of Maine for well over 20 years. Prior to that he spent two seasons in England doing archaeology. He has written one book and numerous articles on Maine historical archaeology and is currently working on another book on Fort Halifax, a French and Indian War period fort in Winslow. He has excavated hundreds of Maine sites for which he has written or co-authored site reports. Prior to his archaeology career, Lee spent seven years in the Navy and is a Vietnam veteran. He lives in Somerville with his wife, Liz.

The Kennebec Historical Society February presentation is free to the public (donations gladly accepted) and will take place on Wednesday, February 15, at 6:30 p.m., at the Maine State Library, 230 State Street, in Augusta.

IF WALLS COULD TALK, Week of February 2, 2017

Katie Ouilette Wallsby Katie Ouilette

Y’know, WALLS, I guess one has to live through local history for as many years as I have to be able to share historic happenings.

Yup, I just got discharged from Skowhegan’s Redington-Fairview Memorial Hospital after a week’s stay and I just have to write to all you faithful readers how fortunate you are to have such an outstanding wellness center in our river city.

Yes, I remember the home of Margaret Chase Smith and her husband Clyde H’s being in the location of our present hospital, while Skowhegan’s first hospital had been across from our Free Public Library, that is before the Redington Hospital was located at 234 Madison Avenue. Yes, first the Smith House was purchased to become the Osteopathic Hospital, in Skowhegan, and, after several years, the hospital at 234 Madison Avenue moved to the original Bloomfield area of Skowhegan and grew and grew until it is presently “what you see.”

Now it is time for accolades to Redington -Fairview General Hospital’s CEO “Dick” Willette and his board of directors for assuring that Skowhegan has only the best of care and comfort for its patients.

Yes, WALLS, you usually take liberties allowed by Roland Hallee, managing editor of The Town Line with regards to word count, but surely you faithful readers will excuse this short column this week. Another time, I’ll elaborate more on my experiences, but for this time, I simply have to say that the ambulance driver and caregivers were extremely tolerant of my pain all the way from East Madison to the hospital, and their fast action allowed my remembering the ambulance’s entering the doors at the hospital and, from that moment, I was cared for but remember nothing until I was returned to my assigned room, hours later.

At this time, I can merely say so many thanks to all who put me through the surgery I needed, for their wonderful care for the seven days I spent there. The surgeons, the doctors, the RNs and CNAs, the physical therapists and the food that was prepared in the kitchen was truly outstanding! We are so fortunate to have had the foresight and caring of all involved in wellness for the Skowhegan area.

It is true that WALLS must make sure Katie does her breathing exercises and walks a bit before heading back to her chair, and WALLS promise more later, but, in the meantime, faithful readers, be thankful that Redington-Fairview General Hospital is for all of us and our care.

I’m Just Curious: Wisdom?

by Debbie Walker

Sometimes I find things on the internet that just really tickle me. The words I am passing on to you today were in an e-mail sent to me by one of my buddies. I know he didn’t come up with all this wisdom and there is nothing else that tells me about the original author. Enjoy:

  1. How important does a person have to be before they are considered assassinated instead of murdered? Did you ever think of something like this? My son-in-law Todd could probably come up with some good ones. He has a head for this stuff. It has me curious now!
  2. Why does a round pizza come in a square box? It probably boils down to dollars and/or cents (sense).
  3. Why is it that people say they ‘slept like a baby’ when babies wake up like every two hours? Babies schedule or menopause that had me up in the bathroom every two hours!
  4. Why is ‘bra’ singular and ‘panties’ plural? Two cups on a bra and one panty in panties. Go figure! I think it’s funny that most bras are designed to help you look more natural! How about that one Madonna used to wear that would remind you of torpedoes.
  5. Why do toasters always have a setting that burns the toast to a horrible crisp, which no decent human being would eat? I liked this one and I also like slightly burned toast and popcorn.
  6. If corn oil is made from corn and vegetable oil is made from vegetables, what is baby oil made from? Oh, that one is just disgusting!
  7. If electricity comes from electrons, does morality come from morons? Who are the morality cops, “They” in ‘they say’?
  8. Why does Superman stop bullets with his chest, but ducks when you throw a revolver at him? I used to ask that a 100 years ago when I was a kid, it didn’t take a degree, it’s TV.
  9. The statistics on sanity is that one out of every four persons is suffering from some sort of mental illness. Think of your three best friends… if they’re okay, then it’s you. Well, now I’m relieved, because when I think of my friends, we’re all in the same boat, just trying to figure out if it’s a row boat or motor boat!

Yeah, okay, so maybe these are really not wisdoms. They are just silly questions and answers. I hope you got a chuckle from these!!

I’m just curious about the questions you might have. Contact me at dwdaffy@yahoo.com, sub line: Wisdoms.

Written by Debbie Walker, of Burnham. She grew up in Burnham, spent 30 years in Central West Coast, Florida, and came back here a couple years ago.

REVIEW POTPOURRI: Orchestra leader: Billy Vaughn; Country artist: Chuck Reed; Recording artist: Tony Martin

Peter Catesby  Peter Cates

Billy Vaughn

Melodies of Love
Dot DLP-109, 10-inch, mono LP, recorded 1955.

Billy Vaughn

Billy Vaughn

As a name in the annals for easy listening from 1955 to 1969, Billy Vaughn (1919 – 1991) was a very successful arranger, orchestra leader and multi-instrumentalist, his saxophoning most memorable on such mega-hits as Sail Along Silvery Moon. Melodies of Love consists of eight tunes celebrating the subject, including his hit cover of Wayne King’s 1940 blockbuster, Melody of Love. The program is a pleasant one, enhanced by what would become the frequent trademark of two saxes in so many of the later records. Also, his background support for most of singer Pat Boone’s 45s, starting in 1956, contributed so much to their sales.

A copy of this original LP is listed, as of January 11, 2017, on Ebay for $13.

Chuck Reed

Cry Like a Baby; I’m Gonna Get Some Sleep Tonight
Mercury 70527, 10-inch vinylite 78, recorded approx.
1954 or ’55.

Chuck Reed

Chuck Reed

Chuck Reed had a recording career mainly centered between 1954 and the mid ‘60s, generally getting some traction, as far as minimal charting and TV appearances, in 1957. The above record combines rural country with white rhythm and blues and is a nice example of the genre. Unfortunately, it has been out of print for decades – found my copy at a junk shop.

Tony Martin

One for My Baby
RCA Victor LPM 3136, 10-inch vinyl LP, recorded early ‘50s.

Tony Martin

Tony Martin

Tony Martin (1913-2012) had one of the top two or three baritone voices singing during the ‘40s – ‘50s pop era and achieved a huge success in film, radio, TV and records, through which I have a sizable number and first got to know his expressive vibrance and warmth as a singer, particularly of romantic ballads.

Harold Arlen (1905-1986) affixed his name to over 500 songs but was most likely best known for his score for the Wizard of Oz. The above LP contains eight of his classic selections: One for my Baby; Between the Devil and the Deep Blue Sea; Come Rain or Come Shine; I’ve Got the World on a String; Stormy Weather; It’s Only a Paper Moon; Let’s Fall in Love; and Get Happy. And Martin gives Arlen his total all, but this LP has been deleted for decades.

Legal Notices, Week of February 2, 2017

STATE OF MAINE
KENNEBEC, ss.
TONI M. FREDETTE,
Plaintiff,
V.
MARY ANN FREDETTE
f/k/a
MARY ANN WENTWORTH
Defendant
SUPERIOR COURT
CIVIL ACTION
DOCKET NO:

ORDER ON PLAINTIFF’S
MOTION TO PERMIT
SERVICE BY PUBLICATION
TITLE TO REAL ESTATE IS INVOLVED
688 AUGUSTA ROAD, WINSLOW, MAINE
BOOK 12300, PAGE 133

A Complaint has been filed with the Court against Defendant MARY ANN FREDETTE f/k/a MARY ANN WENTWORTH, which requires personal service in accordance with Rule 4(d) of the Maine Rules of Civil Procedure.

Upon motion, the Court hereby ORDERS:

That service cannot be made upon MARY ANN FREDETTE, f/k/a MARY ANN WENTWORTH in any of the usual manners prescribed by Rule 4 despite the due diligence of the Plaintiff. Service shall therefore be made upon MARY ANN FREDETTE, f/k/a MARY ANN WENTWORTH and all those who claim or may claim by, through, or under MARY ANN FREDETTE, f/k/a MARY ANN WENTWORTH by publishing this Order once a week for three (3) successive weeks in a newspaper of general circulation in the County of Kennebec, the county in which the property at issue in the Complaint is located and the county in which MARY ANN FREDETTE, f/k/a MARY ANN WENTWORTH was last known to reside.

The first publication shall be made within twenty (20) days after this order is issued. Service by publication shall be complete on the twenty-first (21st) day after the first publication.

Plaintiff seeks a judgment in Kennebec County Superior Court against MARY ANN FREDETTE, f/k/a MARY ANN WENTWORTH to obtain a partition of certain property now owned by Toni M. Fredette and Defendant, and previously owned by Leo and Loretta Fredette, being located at 688 Augusta Road, Winslow, Maine.

The property at issue in the Complaint consists of the property described in the deed recorded at Book 12300 Page 133 at the Kennebec County Registry of Deeds.

A copy of the complaint for partition may be obtained from Plaintiff’s attorney at the address and number below.

If you wish to oppose this lawsuit, you or your attorney MUST PREPARE AND SERVE A WRITTEN ANSWER to the complaint WITHIN TWENTY (20) DAYS after service is completed by the foregoing method.

You or your attorney must serve your answer by delivering a copy of it in person or by mail to the Plaintiff’s attorney, Bryan B. Ward, of the firm of O’Donnell, Lee, 112 Silver Street, Waterville, Maine. You or your attorney must also file the original of your answer with the Court by mailing it to the following address: Kennebec Superior Court, 1 Court Street, Augusta, Maine, before or within a reasonable time after it is served.

IMPORTANT WARNING: IF YOU FAIL TO SERVE AN ANSWER WITHIN THE TIME STATED ABOVE OR IF, AFTER YOU ANSWER, YOU FAIL TO APPEAR AT ANY TIME THE COURT NOTIFIES YOU TO DO SO, A JUDGMENT BY DEFAULT MAY BE ENTERED AGAINST YOU IN YOUR ABSENCE FOR THE RELIEF DEMANDED IN THE COMPLAINT. IF YOU INTEND TO OPPOSE THIS LAWSUIT, DO NOT FAIL TO ANSWER WITHIN THE REQUIRED TIME.
IF YOU BELIEVE THE PLAINTIFF IS NOT ENTITLED TO ALL OR PART OF THE CLAIM SET FORTH IN THE COMPLAINT OR IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A CLAIM OF YOUR OWN AGAINST THE PLAINTIFF, YOU SHOULD TALK TO A LAWYER. IF YOU FEEL YOU CANNOT AFFORD TO PAY A FEE TO A LAWYER, YOU MAY ASK THE COURT FOR INFORMATION AS TO PLACES WHERE YOU MAY SEEK LEGAL ASSISTANCE.

Dated: January 15, 2017
/s/ Michaela Murphy
Justice, Superior Court
Plaintiff’s Attorney:
Bryan B. Ward
O’Donnell and Lee
112 Silver Street
Waterville, Maine 04901
Telephone: (207) 872-0112
(2/9)

STATE OF MAINE
PROBATE COURT
Court St., Skowhegan, ME
Somerset, SS
Location of Court
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
18-A MRSA sec. 3-801

The following Personal Representatives have been appointed in the estates noted. The first publication date of this notice is January 26, 2017.

If you are a creditor of an estate listed below, you must present your claim within four months of the first publication date of this Notice to Creditors by filing a written statement of your claim on a proper form with the Register of Probate of this Court or by delivering or mailing to the Personal Representative listed below at the address published by his name, a written statement of the claim indicating the basis therefore, the name and address of the claimant and the amount claimed or in such other manner as the law may provide. See 18-A MRSA 3-804.

2017-001 – Estate of CLINTON B. TOWNSEND, late of Canaan, Me deceased. Benjamin P. Townsend, 76 Williams Road, Chelsea, Me 04330 appointed Personal Representative.

2017-002 – Estate of CLIFFORD J. FECTEAU, late of Fairfield, I deceased. Thomas A. Little, 4 Sterling Drive, Westbrook, Me 04092 appointed Personal Representative.

2017-004 – Estate of SCOTT E. GREEN, late of Harmony, Me deceased. Thomas Bellen PO Box 277, North Conway, NH 03860 and Anna L. Green, 17 Carson Hill Road, Harmony, Me 04942 appointed Co-Personal Representatives.

2017-005 – Estate of DANIELLE A. DAVIS, late of Skowhegan, Me deceased. Maureen D. Davis, 418 Waterville Road, Skowhegan, Me 04976 appointed Personal Representative.

2017-006 – Estate of EDGAR L. BEAULIEU, late of Pittsfield, Me deceased. Madalyn L. Ring, 116 Higgins Road, Pittsfield, Me 04967 appointed Personal Representative.

2017-007 – Estate of KATHLEEN ANN BERNIER, late of Solon, Me deceased. Cristi Ann Dickey, 383 South Solon Road, Solon, Maine 04979 appointed Personal Representative.

2016-334 – Estate of VALERIE TIEMAN, late of Fairfield, Me deceased. Gene Allen Harmon, 805 Ikes Road, Taylors, SC 29687 appointed Personal Representative.

2017-009 – Estate of LEWIS B. HAYES, late of Skowhegan, Me deceased. James D. Hayes, PO Box 496, Canaan, Me 04924 appointed Personal Representative.

2017-013 – Estate of JACK E. RANDALL, late of Palmyra, Me deceased. Linda M. Burleigh, 7 South Street, Newport, Me 04953 appointed Personal Representative.

2017-014 – Estate of ELIZABETH D. RANDALL, late of Palmyra, Me deceased. Linda M. Burleigh, 7 South Street, Newport, Me 04953 appointed Personal Representative.

2017-015 – Estate of DORIS H. ISHERWOOD, late of Albany, NY deceased. Sharron-Linn Schmidt, 1124 Howard Street, Schenectady, NY 12303-1241 appointed Personal Representative.

2017-018 – Estate of CHRISTIE ANN JAMES, late of Madison, Me deceased. Ruth Lyons, 77 Bennoch Road, Orono, Me 04473 appointed Personal Representative.

2017-019 – Estate of ROY E. FICKETT, late of Norridgewock, Me deceased. Randal R. Fickett, 520 Stevenstown Road, Litchfield, Me 04350 AND Diana L. Wade, PO Box 116, Norridgewock, Me 04957 appointed Co-Personal Representatives.

2017-020 – Estate of WILLIAM C. ROACH, late of Athens, Me deceased. Marlene F. Roach, 11170 Broadstone Way, Apex, NC 27502 appointed Personal Representative.

To be published on Jan 26 & Feb. 2, 2017
Dated: January 23, 2017 /s/ Victoria Hatch,
Register of Probate
(2/2)

STATE OF MAINE
PROBATE COURT
41 COURT ST.
SOMERSET, SS.
SKOWHEGAN, ME
PROBATE NOTICES

TO ALL PERSONS INTERESTED IN ANY OF THE ESTATES LISTED BELOW

Notice is hereby given by the respective petitioners that they have filed petitions for appointment of personal representatives in the following estates. These matters will be heard at 10 a.m. or as soon thereafter as they may be, on February 8, 2017. The requested appointments may be made on or after the hearing date if no sufficient objection be heard. This notice complies with the requirements of 18-A MRSA §3-403 and Probate Rule 4.

2016-344 – Estate of NATALIE ELIZABETH LEPAGE. Petition for Change of Name (Minor) filed by Stacey Slate, PO Box 56, North Anson, Me 04950 requesting minor’s name be changed to Natalie Elizabeth Slate for reasons set forth therein.

2017-003 – Estate of ALICE MARIE MULLEN. Petition for Change of Name (Adult) filed by Alice Marie Mullen, 20 AJ Drive, Norridgewock, Maine 04957 requesting that her name be changed to Alice Marie Berry for reasons set forth therein.

Dated: January 23, 2017 /s/ Victoria Hatch,
Register of Probate
(2/2)

STATE OF MAINE
PROBATE COURT
SOMERSET, SS
NOTICE TO HEIRS
STATE OF MAINE
PROBATE COURT SOMERSET, SS.
41 COURT STREET, SKOWHEGAN, MAINE 04976

Estate of RAYMOND P. WALTERS, Docket No. 2016-346

A Petition for Informal Probate of Will or Appointment of Personal Representative Under a Will or Both has been filed in the estate of RAYMOND P. WALTERS. Said petition notes that there is the possibility that unknown and unascertained heirs may exist whose identity and whereabouts cannot, with the exercise of due diligence, be determined. Accordingly, notice is hereby given to such possible heirs of the existence of the Petition for Informal Probate of Will or Appointment of Personal Representative Under a Will or Both filed.

The following are the names of the unknown and unascertained heirs whose complete address is unknown:

Robert Read

THEREFORE, notice is hereby given to them as heirs of the above named estate, pursuant to Maine Rules of Probate Procedure Rule 4(d) (1) (a), and Rule 4 (e) a.

This notice shall be published once a week for two successive weeks in the Town Line, a newspaper having general circulation in Somerset County, with the first publication date to be January 26, 2017.

Name and address of proposed Personal Representative: Teri McRae, 107 Parsons Pond Drive, Portland, Me 04103.

Dated: January 10, 2017
Victoria M. Hatch
Register of Probate
(2/2)

STATE OF MAINE
PROBATE COURT
SOMERSET, SS
NOTICE TO HEIRS

Estate of DORIS H. ISHERWOOD
Docket No. 2017-015

It appearing that an heir of Doris H. Isherwood as listed in an Application for Informal Appointment of Personal Representative is of unknown address as listed below:

Tracy Lynn Arnold aka Nikki Taylor

And any and all other heirs of said decedent who are unknown and whose addresses are unknown.

THEREFORE, notice is hereby given as heir of the above named estate, pursuant to Maine Rules of Probate Procedure Rule 4(d) (1) (a), and Rule 4 (e) a.

This notice shall be published once a week for two successive weeks in the Town Line, with the first publication date to be January 26, 2017.

Name and address of proposed Personal Representative:

Sharron-Linn Schmidt, 1124 Howard Street, Schenectady, NY 12303-1241.

Dated: January 19, 2017
/s/ Victoria M. Hatch
Register of Probate
(2/2)

MCS essay contest announced

The Margaret Chase Smith Library announced the topic of its 21st annual essay contest – drug abuse. As far back as 1951, Senator Smith warned that “one of the great threats to our country today is the preying of narcotic peddlers upon our children.” Since the 1980s, the nation has waged a war on drugs with mixed results. The Margaret Chase Smith Library invites Maine high school seniors to propose how they would address the current lethal drug epidemic.

Entries are due by April 1, 2017, and decisions will be announced on May 1. Prizes are $50 for five honorable mentions, $250 for third place, $500 for second place, and $1,000 for first place. For more information, visit the Library’s website (http://www.mcslibrary.org/program/edu/essay.htm) or contact John Taylor at 474-7133.

Located in Skowhegan, Maine, the library is owned by the Margaret Chase Smith Foundation and operated under its auspices by the University of Maine. The Margaret Chase Smith Library is an archive, museum, educational facility, and public policy center devoted to preserving the legacy of Margaret Chase Smith, promoting research into American political history, advancing the ideals of public service, and exploring issues of civic engagement.