LETTERS: Smiles, waves and happy birthday

To the editor:

Smiles, waves and happy birthday was the reception I received as I was returning to my car after voting at the Palermo Town Office.

But wait – I am getting ahead of myself.

When I went to the end of the long line of masked people waiting to vote, the couple that just got in line told me to go in front of them. Soon a lady asked me to get in line in front of her, then another asked me to do the same. A man pointed to a place where I could sit down and said he would save a place before him for me.

I’m unsure if that was the man who found a larger cooler, brought it for me to use. When he asked to put the cooler in place, the person at the very front told him to put the cooler before him. All this time a lady from the line let me use her shoulder to help my balance.

This lady asked me what happened to my legs, and I replied that nothing happened to them, that it was just old age creeping in. Then I added that it was my birthday and I just turned 94. When I asked her name, she gave it to me. I recognized it immediately and told her we were neighbors. (Not really, but I pass her house when going to Route 3.)

I was treated with the same respect and kindness when inside and Dave, a man who was working inside, said he would help me to my car. That brings me back to the smiles, waves and greetings I received.

At one o’clock that afternoon, the Palermo Library opened its door for the monthly meeting of the Palermo Quilt Club. All state and local restrictions were obeyed. Unbeknownst to me, one member of the quilt club was in the voting line. She hurried home and made a large chocolate chip cookie (4 – 5 inches) and put a candle in the middle. She brought it to me, lit the candle and everyone sang happy birthday to me.

I thank everyone in that long line for helping me and also the members of the quilt club who made this day a wonderful memory. I also thank everyone in Palermo for the kindness they have shared with me and my family since I traded being a “Buckeye” from Ohio, to a “Mainiac” from Maine. Or, as my grandchildren say, “from a worthless nut to a Mainiac.”

Joan L. Robertson
Palermo

 
 

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