GARDEN WORKS: Seeds of your dreams: Letters “S” through “T” (Part 6)

Read part 1 here: Seeds from your dreams, Part 1 (A-thru-E)
Read part 2 here: Seeds of your dreams, Part 2 (G-H)
Read part 3 here: Seeds of your dreams: Find joy in a seed catalog, Part 3 (H-N)
Read part 4 here: Seeds of your dreams: Digging for garden gems, Part 4 (O-P)
Read part 5 here: Seeds of your dreams: More ideas from the catalog, Part 5 (P-R)

Emily Catesby Emily Cates

A long winter leaves me weary, longing for the promise of the heady warmth of Springtime. As the snow melts and gives way to mud, my senses are rejuvenated, along with ambition and hopes for a productive season. The search for seeds plays such an integral part of this equation that an enthusiastic grower may make a ritual out of it. How wonderful to sit down with good friends and seed catalogs and imagine the possibilities! In this series of articles we have been looking at an alphabetical list of noteworthy seeds and ideas for a northern garden. We’ll continue on past the letter “S” and beyond. As always, feel free to share your thoughts and ideas with us. I’d love to hear from you. Go ahead and leave a comment on our website, Facebook page, or email me at EmilyCates@townline.org.

Squash – The fruits of this vining plant have so much to offer — a kaleidoscope of all kinds of shapes, sizes, colors, flavors, textures, storage abilities, and unmatched versatility. There are so many to chose from, you could grow a different cultivar every year for your entire life and never try them all. (To get an idea of the splendid diversity of this plant, read Amy Goldman’s The Compleat Squash.) Squash’s historical and nutritional values have played a part in the diets of native peoples in the Americas for millennium. As one of the “Three Sisters” triad of corn, beans and squash, it serves additional benefits of keeping the roots of corn shaded, acting as a living mulch, and protecting the corn from marauding raccoons and other pests. Livestock love squash and some utility varieties, such as Kurbis, were actually bred with them in mind. The culinary ones, of course, are what make it to the table. A large Hubbard squash is fit for a family feast, and a sweet and petit Delicata squash will satisfy a solo diner. While so-called summer squashes such as Patty Pan and Cushaw are delicious in savory dishes, the winter squashes like Buttercup are amazing in pies and desserts. Butternut, Cheese, Kabocha, Turban — these are all decent types for soups, mashed, roasted, you name it. The edible flowers of squash are good, too, when barely opened and then stuffed or stir-fried. Just beware of bees hanging out in the flowers. A heavy feeder, squash prefers warm, rich soil — even a compost pile — and plenty of water during its growing season.

Sunflowers – These cheerful flowers follow the sun and brighten my day with their impressive array of design, colors, seeds, and chocolaty-scents. I’ve never met a sunflower I didn’t like, even the giant ones grown for seeds and oil are a beauty to behold. The ornamental cultivars are a feast for the eyes. I like to tuck as many sunflowers into as many spaces of the garden as possible. Even if the birds end up getting the seeds, the flowers sure make it pretty.

Tomatoes – Much like squash, the tomato has an equally diverse repertoire of colors, shapes, sizes, flavors, types, and uses. Now if you, like myself, despise tomatoes from the grocery store, then you’re in for a real treat! Nothing compares to a vine-ripened tomato warmed from the sun and enjoyed in the garden, on the patio, or at a picnic table. I will admit, whether it’s a handful of cherry tomatoes popped into my happy mouth, or a giant heirloom tomato attacked one slurping bite at a time and dripping all over my face and work-shirt, I’ve found no shame in enjoying a “Tom-ahhh-to.” Keep it classy and serve up a colorful variety of sliced heirloom tomatoes layered with herbs, sprinkled with a little salt, and drizzled with olive oil. Yum! In my search for the perfect tomato, I’ve grown well over 500 cultivars. The following are some of my favorites: Cosmonaut Volkov (red, slicer), Brandywine (medium-large, pink), Lillian’s Yellow Heirloom (large, clear yellow), Aunt Ruby’s German Green (medium-large, green), Pineapple (large bi-colored), Green Zebra (medium-small, green striped over amber), Heart of Compassion (medium-large oxheart type), Opalka (paste), Sungold (hybrid, orange cherry tomato), Black Cherry (black cherry tomato), and Pocket Star (green cherry tomato). Plant tomatoes in rich soil amended with manure or compost, stake or trellis them, use a black plastic mulch, and fertilize weekly with a diluted fish-seaweed formula for good results.

Well, that’s all the space we have for now. But, before I go, I’d like to tell you: the coolest thing is that maple sap is an incredible ingredient to cook with! If you’re tapping trees this year, set aside some sap and cook a whole chicken (with or without fixings) in the sap overnight in a slow-cooker or on the stovetop. Serve as is, or add a little salt and/or herbs to taste. Best chicken soup ever, wow! Try it and let me know what you think.

Emily can be reached at EmilyCates@townline.org.

GARDEN WORKS: Getting through times of change

Elisabeth, 14, in an office in Babelsberg, Germany, in 1954. (contributed photo.)

Advice from a survivor of WWII

Emily Catesby Emily Cates

Well, folks, I was planning on writing another article in my series about good finds from seed catalogs, but with everything happening with COVID-19, I figured it would be prudent to write about something more relevant. In this new era of uncertainty and social distancing, many of us appreciate helpful information on how to get through it all.

While unprecedented to most of us in modern America, these circumstances are surprisingly similar to events experienced by those in our area nearly a century ago during the Great Depression, and also by folks who made it through World War I – World War II in Europe and beyond. In this article I will share with you a few things I gleaned from discussions I’ve had with my mother-in-law, Elisabeth, who survived World War II and lived for decades in Communist East Germany (DDR) before a dramatic opportunity in 1969 led her to Maine. While her story could fill an entire book, I’ll try to highlight the weightier points, and add a few that other family members have pointed out to me.

One of the first things she mentioned was how grocery shopping in the past week or two reminded her and family and friends back home of grocery stores in the former DDR. Many shelves now, like then, are empty as shoppers engage in panic-buying and hoarding. Back then, you had to buy something when you saw it, since you never knew when or if you’d see it again. However, she remarked how unnecessary it is for shoppers here to behave this way, since our infrastructure — unlike the DDR’s — is intact and operating.

Yes, Elisabeth thinks it’s always a good idea to be stocked-up on necessities at all times, but preferably before a crisis, so that others who have a real need are able to obtain their groceries. “You’re not going to starve to death,” she says, “since even if your food gets stolen, you can go outside to your garden and also find edible weeds. You might not get what you want, but you will find something.” I’ll take that advice, since it comes from someone who oftentimes refused to eat so that her little sister would have food.

Another point she mentioned was how useful it was to have a garden. With her thick accent, she affirms: “Plant lots of beans and peas; plant carrots, beets, and other root vegetables.” In the aftermath of World War I, in the winter of 1919-1920, many inhabitants of Continental Europe, including Elisabeth’s father, had mostly turnips to eat. Every recipe you could imagine was made with turnips, including turnip jam. Naturally, when other foods became available, few folks ever wanted to even think about a turnip again. While one could argue we’re not — yet — in the same situation here, the point is to never underestimate the power of root vegetables to sustain humankind through turbulent times. How much better, though, to have a nice variety of them, rather than just one!

As they were able to, many folks in Post-World War II Europe did what they could to get by. Those that had the room and circumstances took advantage of every opportunity to be self-sufficient, including raising chickens, scooping up horse manure from the street for the garden, and bartering. Regarding sweets (from which many of us would be hard-pressed to abstain), Elisabeth’s parents had a huge washtub in their cellar in which they boiled down sugar beets for syrup because they couldn’t obtain granulated sugar. They would have this syrup as a sweet treat once a week and for special occasions. They also raised goats for milk and meat, but on one occasion they fell in love with the baby goat, and after Oma spent hours preparing a roast of it, nobody in the family could eat it. They gave the roast to their neighbor.

The last thing that comes to mind from our conversations is the importance of a meditative space in stressful times. Oftentimes overlooked, but equally important, is the mind-healing properties of a garden. When everything around us seems to crumble, the natural world reassures us of the bigger picture. In the garden we share a place where we can be nourished, grounded, and guided. May we never lose sight of what really matters, and be there for each other no matter what comes our way.

In closing for this article, I’d like to hear your thoughts. What do you think would help us get through tough times? Please leave a comment on our website or Facebook, or email me at EmilyCates@townline.org.

Take care, be safe, and best wishes for the Springtime.

GARDEN WORKS – Seeds of your dreams: More ideas from the catalog, Part 5 (P-R)

Read part 1 here: Seeds from your dreams, Part 1 (A-thru-E)
Read part 2 here: Seeds of your dreams, Part 2 (G-H)
Read part 3 here: Seeds of your dreams: Find joy in a seed catalog, Part 3 (H-N)
Read part 4 here: Seeds of your dreams: Digging for garden gems, Part 4 (O-P)

Emily Catesby Emily Cates

As I step outside and take a walk around my yard, I am greeted by the sound of melting snow and the scent of thawing earth. Embraced by a gentle breeze, I gaze at the garden beds still covered in receding blankets of snow. As this blanket disappears, dreams of seedlings emerge, along with ideas of endless possibilities of what to plant in these beds. With a few trusty seed catalogs as my guide, these dreams and ideas are ever closer to being fulfilled. In this series of articles, I have shared with you a bunch of my favorite finds from seed catalogs. Let’s continue on and look at a few more alphabetically, this time picking up at the letter ‘P’ and going on through ‘R.’ As always, you are warmly invited to share your thoughts and ideas with us on our website or Facebook, or email me at EmilyCates@townline.org.

Peas – These plants do their best when planted as early as possible in areas with moderate fertility, and given something such as a trellis to grow on. Peas are cherished for their nitrogen-fixing abilities as well as their culinary values. Few garden pleasures compare with a pea pod at the peak of perfection, plucked from the vine, and popped into a happy mouth. In my years as a gardener, I confess that only small numbers of peas have actually made it to my kitchen compared to what I’ve eaten right there on the spot — in the plot, at an impromptu pig-out. I dub it the “Garden Cafe,” and no restaurant I’ve ever been to has adequately captured the exquisite experience of enjoying fresh peas as they are picked. From the ones that survive being eaten in the garden, one can choose from shell peas, snow peas, snap peas and soup peas. Purple-podded peas are a sight to behold.

Peppers – These guys can be a challenge in cold areas, as they are more adapted to warm climates. But it can be done. In our area, peppers prefer to start indoors in March-April and set outside after the last frost. Maine-grown peppers need to be pampered and appreciate being planted in a sheltered location with a shovelful or two of compost into black plastic mulch, and foliar-fed a dilution of fish/seaweed weekly. Pick the first fruits as they size up to increase productivity. The vast, beautiful, and delicious varieties of peppers are stunning. Peppers are versatile, with cultivars specialized for snacking, stuffing, frying, ristras, pickling, pimento, paprika, spices, hot sauce, and even self-defense sprays. They come in almost every color of the rainbow, have flavors of varying degrees of sweetness and spiciness, and display many different shapes and sizes. Some peppers make gorgeous ornamentals, and a few even have variegated leaves. Some are masters of deception: they look like harmless sweet peppers, but pack a ferocious bite. Others look frighteningly hot, but are really sweet on the inside. The cultivar Beaver Dam is both sweet and spicy, but the heat can be removed by cutting out the seeds and ribs. It’s my favorite pepper — easier to grow than many others, and multipurpose. Some years I prefer to cultivate a few plants of only this pepper to enjoy it and save the seeds, and then other years I’ll grow a wide assortment of peppers to make it fun.

Quinoa – This popular supergrain grows in cool, dry climates, and could theoretically be a viable crop in our area with the right cultivars. Since I haven’t actually tried growing quinoa (that could change soon!), here’s a website that might be useful if you’d like to check it out: Tips For Growing Your Own Quinoa. I would love to hear from you if you’ve tried growing it.

Radish – These fast-growing, cool weather-loving plants make piquant roots, nutritious greens, and — in some cultivars — scrumptious seed pods. They range in size from cherry-sized spheres, all the way to giant, foot-long daikon radishes. There’s an array of eye-catching colors, too — black, white, cream, scarlet, red, rose, pink, purple, green, and even multicolored. Rat Tail is a rather radical radish grown for its seed pods and used in pickles, stir fries, and more. Radish greens, though nutritious, are probably more palatable to poultry due to their coarseness — though I’ve been known to eat them steamed or stir-fried if no other greens are available. Lacto-fermented radish root pickles are amazing. What’s for breakfast? A fresh, crisp, breakfast radish, of course! Try it for yourself and see how effective it is for clearing the morning cobwebs from your head.

Once again we’ve reached the end of the line for today, but that’s okay. We’ll look at a few more on the list next time. Until then, enjoy your search for garden gems. Let me know what you find!

GARDEN WORKS – Seeds of your dreams: Digging for garden gems, Part 4 (O-P)

Read part 1 here: Seeds from your dreams, Part 1 (A-thru-E)
Read part 2 here: Seeds of your dreams, Part 2 (G-H)
Read part 3 here: Seeds of your dreams: Find joy in a seed catalog, Part 3 (H-N)

Emily Catesby Emily Cates

When I’ve come in from a cold late winter’s day after hauling sap, I like to sit down and settle in with a seed catalog. If you’ve been following this whimsical series on seeds that stand out in the pages of their catalogs, then this article might give you a few more ideas. This time we’ll travel alphabetically from ‘O’ to ‘P’. As always, feel free to share your suggestions on our website or Facebook, or email me at EmilyCates@townline.org. I’m looking forward to hearing from you!

Okra — The mucilaginous yet tasty pods of this plant are adored in gumbo soup and similar dishes where a thickener is desired. It likes heat, fertile soil, and a weed-free plot. The cultivar Cajun Jewel is better adapted to our climate here in Maine, and Red Burgundy produces a beautiful plant with ornamental flowers and pods.

Onions — Onions grown from sets or plants are relatively easy to grow. While they can be started from seed — affording the gardener more choice of varieties — I prefer just to buy some good sets and plants at seed sales in the springtime and plant away. Give them full sun and choice soil, showering them with amendments such as FEDCO’s “Tears of Joy Onion Kit.”

Pac Choi — Probably my favorite veggie in a stir fry, I’m especially enamored with the beautiful and delicious cultivar, Purple. Last year, I grew a few plants in a big container full of compost and they were amazing, even though I’d harvested them a little late and they were frozen. What a treat!

Potato — If this versatile tuber is on your menu, how about trying something new and exciting? My favorite potatoes, many with names that hint of their uniqueness, are: All Blue, All Red, Banana, German Butterball, Kennebec, Magic Molly, Purple Viking, and Yukon Gold. Of course, with such variety — red, rose, pink, beige, yellow, gold, white, blue, purple, marbled, russet, fingerling — comes great temptation to try them all. Give the funky ones a chance and have fun. And have even more fun by saving any mature seed balls that mature on the top of the plant. Extract the seeds enclosed in a seed ball, dry them, and sow them next year in flats like tomato seedlings. Each potato seedling that sprouts is a whole new cultivar! In a couple of years you’ll have full-sized plants and potatoes. Save the best ones and enjoy your signature cultivar.

Pumpkin — Most of us are familiar with ornamental and pie pumpkins, but they are so much more than insipid orange orbs. Have you ever thought of pickling a pumpkin? Grow the cultivar Jaune Gros de Paris (Large Yellow of Paris) and I’ll send you a sweet family recipe. How about nutritious and delicious pepitas like at the store, but better? Grow the “naked seed” cultivars such as Good Egg Godiva, Kakai, and Naked Bear. Want something fun and interesting to look at? You’ll want to check out Cheese, Chioggia, Galeux d’Eysines, Jarrahdale, Musquee de Provence, Rouge Vif d’Etampes, or Turban. For the ultimate pumpkin pie experience try the curiously elongated Long Pie, or silky-textured Winter Luxury. And if you’re in it to break records, consider Dill’s Atlantic Giant, or Big Max for a good runner up.

Parsnip — This root is delicious when matchstick sliced, drizzled with oil, roasted, and seasoned to taste. It needs a long season, deep, rich, weed-free soil, and fresh seed. I always leave some plants in the ground to overwinter, promptly harvesting in early Spring before they regrow. They are much sweeter this way and after an autumn frost. Also, since the seeds are short-lived, I make sure to leave a few more plants to go to seed, replant, and also let them self-sow.

Purslane — Perhaps you’ve encountered the wild form of this plant as a weed in your garden — lucky you! The creeping, succulent, mild-but-pleasantly-tart stems and paddle-shaped leaves are considered a nutritious delicacy. I, for one, adore this plant. Though the weed form rarely shows up in my garden, I always make sure to plant the cultivated variety Golden and it does quite well.

Looks like that’s all for this time, but there’s plenty more for next. Stay tuned and keep in touch. Oh, and let me know if you’re tapping maples this year and how it’s going!

GARDEN WORKS – Seeds of your dreams: Find joy in a seed catalog, Part 3 (H-N)

Read part 1 here: Seeds from your dreams: Coming from a seed catalog to you, Part 1 (A-thru-E)
Read part 2 here: Seeds of your dreams, Part 2 (G-H)

Emily Catesby Emily Cates

The crackle of a cozy fire, the crinkling pages of a seed catalog, the whistling of the kettle bubbling with water for my tea— all creature comforts to accompany me as I search for treasures hidden within the pages. Whether it’s the black-and-white FEDCO catalog that stands out for its literary content as well as its seeds, the Johnny’s catalog brimming with full color photos, or the Pinetree catalog loaded with seeds and gift ideas, there’s sure to be something for everyone.

With all this in mind, let’s take a look at a few more seeds that in my opinion are worth finding as we search our catalogs. Let’s look at letters ‘H’ through ‘N’ this time. If you have any ideas or suggestions, feel free to share them on our website or Facebook page, or email me at EmilyCates@townline.org.

Hyssop, anise – I was actually going to start at the letter ‘I’, but I realized I had almost forgotten about one of my favorite herbs of all time – anise hyssop. It’s related to neither anise nor hyssop, but is an herbal superstar in its own right. With mint-like leaves and cute, purple, spire-like flowers, this perennial herb begs all to make friends with it. The foliage and flowers taste delightfully sweet and licorice-like (in a good way!). Delicious herbal teas and confections await this special herb.

Indian Corn – I know I already mentioned corn in a previous article in this series, but the so-called Indian corn cultivars are a must for anyone who appreciates the beauty and historical value of this plant. Look for Abenaki Calais Flint, Hopi Blue, and Painted Mountain.

Juneberries – I have a few of these wonderful native fruiting shrubs planted right alongside the edge of my garlic patch and beyond. Think of a plant with a variable form – shrub- or treelike – that is one of the first to bloom in springtime. Then think of a juicy fruit with the appearance of a blueberry, with a taste reminiscent of a luscious mix of apples and almonds. That is a juneberry!

Kale – This trendy superfood might have peaked in popularity, but it really shines as a staple in every garden not only for its nutritional value, but for its ability to grow in the cold. When other plants have hunkered down for the winter or expired, kale just keeps on growing. It’s such a delight to harvest it during a December snowstorm, or to dig for it in the snow, like green treasure. It’s sweeter then, too. Look for a variety pack of kales and enjoy its diversity.

Lettuce – What’s a garden without lettuce? I, for one, can’t get enough of the flashy, frizzled, spotted, and speckled kinds. There’s such a stunning variety of kinds, I know I’ll never try them all and console myself with a dazzling variety pack of mixed types and colors. Lettuce, for the most part, prefers cooler weather and doesn’t mind a little shade where it can grow among other plants in the garden.

Melons – If you don’t mind a challenge, grow melons in Maine. With the right selection of short-season cultivars, a bit of compost, plenty of sunshine, and black plastic mulch, it just might work. Look for Golden Gopher, Prescott Fond Blanc, and Hannahs Choice. For exquisite watermelons, find Cream of Saskatchewan (my favorite), Moon and Stars, and Blacktail Mountain.

Nasturtiums – What is a garden or patio without nasturtiums? They look good wherever they grow. Not only are their leaves and flowers adorable, but they are delicious in a spicy, peppery way. Insect pests, however, don’t find them as palatable, and as a result, nasturtiums are often planted alongside other plants in the garden as a natural and aesthetically pleasing repellent. I like how a mix of trailing cultivars cascades over the side of a flowerpot, like a cheerful, colorful waterfall. Look for Alaska Mix, Empress of India, Jewel Mix, Tall Climbing Mix, Peach Melba, and Whirlybird 7-Color Blend.

Looks like that’s all the space we have for this time. I hope you have fun hunting for seeds. Let me know what you find!

GARDEN WORKS: Seeds of your dreams, Part 2 (G-H)

Read part one here: Seeds from your dreams, Part 1 (A-thru-E)

Emily Catesby Emily Cates

Calling all gardeners! There’s treasure hiding among the pages of all those seed catalogs, ready to be highlighted and added to your order form. In our last article, we looked at a few alphabetically and got all the way to “E for eggplant.” Now let’s move on to “G for garlic” and beyond. Please feel free to share your thoughts for what’s on your dream garden wish list in a comment on our website or Facebook, or email me at EmilyCates@townline.org.

Garlic – A staple in my garden, I’d never be without good-old German Extra Hardy. It does best when fall-planted, but it’s possible to start it in the spring.

Ginger – While a lot of folks who grow ginger on a market scale in Maine use high tunnels and hoop houses, a simple, well-drained flowerpot with good potting soil can accommodate a plant or two for an occasional treat. I bring mine in before a frost in fall, and outside after a frost in springtime. It looks pretty good as a houseplant, too.

Ginseng – I just found seeds for this in the Johnny’s catalog! Though my initial attempt to grow ginseng years ago was not a success, I am determined to try again. Let me know your experiences with ginseng.

Gourds – This is another plant with endless possibilities to fire an artist’s imagination. Not only are gourds delightfully ornamental, they can be fashioned into useful objects such as canteens, containers, dippers, birdhouses, children’s toys, musical instruments and more.

Grains – These crops are incredibly important from a historic perspective, but are equally important now as food, forage, cover crops, and ornamentals. On a small, garden-scaled plot, try hulless oats, Opopeo amaranth, and Duborskian rice.

Grapes – While many folks think of vineyards when they think of grapes, all that is needed is a well-drained, moderately fertile, sunny spot, preferably with something the grapevine can climb on – such as a fence, gazebo, or trellis of some sort. Brianna, Somerset Seedless, and King of the North are among my favorites.

Greens – I never seem to be able to get enough of them, and I’ll probably die trying to plant as many packets of mixed greens as I can get my hands on. The varieties for braising seem to hold up well in my garden. Also, the green known as Good King Henry is a perennial, spinach-like plant that even self-sows. What could be better than that?

Groundnut – As a child, I always wondered about a distinctive fragrance along a meadow near China Lake, until discovering it was actually groundnut. What a wonderful surprise to find out that this useful plant, that nourished native peoples from ancient times, would grow well at my home. This lovely native perennial vine with unusual, highly fragrant maroon/pinkish leguminous flowers yields tasty, protein-filled tubers that are edible and delicious when peeled and cooked. It likes damp, shady places with something to climb on, and will care for itself once established.

Herbs – I’ve mentioned a few, and though they are more commonly recognized for their culinary properties, herbs also provide medicine, pest control, aromatherapy, dyes, art projects, and more. Why not plant some herbs among garden plants to confuse their pests?

Horseradish – When planted in an area outside of the garden where its invasive-ness can be controlled, horseradish pretty much takes care of itself. Its bold, bold flavor commands respect unsuitable for the fainthearted.

Husk Cherry – These sweet, pineapple-flavored, cherry tomato-resembling fruits are encased in a husk and are ready to eat when they fall from their plant. Oftentimes they will self-sow, to my delight.

Well, looks like we only made it to “H” this time on our whimsical stroll through our seed catalogs. No worries, we’ll look at a bunch more next time. Until then, stay tuned and let me know your thoughts.

Read part 3 here: Seeds of your dreams: Find joy in a seed catalog, Part 3 (H-N)

GARDEN WORKS: Seeds from your dreams: Coming from a seed catalog to you, part 1 (A-thru-E)

Emily Catesby Emily Cates

As the wind whips through the drifting snow, I snuggle up by the wood stove with a warm cup of tea and a seed catalog. Each year there’s something new, along with seeds tried and true.

With imagination running wild, I run my highlighter through the pages, highlighting the objects of desire until the ink runs dry. Flipping through the pages with great enthusiasm and stars in my eyes, I pause to envision my garden brimming with the results of planting these seeds.

Since this is a good time of year to plan a garden and order seeds, let’s look at some possibilities we’ll find in catalogs. In this series, we’ll examine an “A to Z of Possibilities” wish list ranging from easy-to-grow things I’d never go without, and a few more that leave me intrigued. If you have any suggestions or thoughts on what’s on your dream garden wish list, feel free to leave a comment on our website or Facebook page, or send me a message to my brand new email address: EmilyCates@townline.org.

Arugula – Probably my favorite salad or braising green, its nutty, peppery crunch always makes me happy. Oftentimes it self-sows for an encore performance.

Asparagus – If you have a sunny, weed-free, fertile patch of soil, try planting Purple Passion asparagus.

Ashwagandha – This herb from the nightshade family grows a root that is used for its adaptogenic properties similar to ginseng.

Basil – Nowadays there are many cultivars with a dazzling array of many shapes, colors, and aromas. My favorite basil, Mrs. Burns’ Lemon, looks absolutely amazing interplanted with other basils such as Purple Ruffles, Spicy Bush, and lettuce leaf varieties. Don’t forget Genovese basil for the best pesto on the planet.

Beans – Pole beans, bush beans, runner beans, shell beans, green beans, yellow beans, purple beans, soup beans, wax beans, haricots verts, oh my! I have definitely tried my share of bean varieties over the years, and I’ve learned that one could spend an entire lifetime trialing a new bean every year. So many colors and patterns to choose from, it’s easy to get boggled looking at beans in a catalog. But try the interesting ones anyways – like Red Noodle, Drabo, and Dragon’s Tongue – and have fun.

Beets – If you can grow beets, the cultivar Chioggia is delicious and pretty with its bullseye pattern of pink and white when sliced.

Carrots – Carrots of today are available in a wide range of beautiful colors. Though they are sometimes a challenge to grow in my clay-based soil, the ones that do well are especially delicious after a frost. Try a seed packet of mixed colors and plant something exciting.

Cilantro – Either you love it or hate it. Whether or not it tastes like the essential ingredient of a superb salsa – or dish soap – will determine whether or not it will be planted in your garden plot.

Corn – It’s difficult to grow corn when surrounded by hungry birds and beasts, but a good year will yield enough to enjoy fresh, roasted, steamed, ground, popped, decoratively, and more. For something a little different, look for Earth Tones (a beautiful dent corn), and Pennsylvania Dutch Butter Flavored Popcorn (the hands-down best popcorn in the universe).

Cucumbers – I find the specialty cukes to be fabulous, especially Boothby’s Blonde, Poona Kheera, and the round Lemon cucumber. I’m also intrigued with Mexican Sour Gherkin, a cucumber-like plant that produces fruits that taste refreshingly like they were already pickled. (This I keep intending to try, hopefully I’ll get around to it this year.) Let me know your experience with it.

Dahlias – The tubers of this gorgeous flower are edible – so consider planting a cultivar selected for table qualities – and beautify your garden.

Eggplant – Even if you’re not a fan of eggplant, its fruit grows in so many eye-catching colors that it might deserve a spot to be admired.

Wow! I can’t believe the A to Z wish list for this time only went to “E”. Let’s pick up “G for garlic” next time. Again, don’t forget to leave a comment on our website or Facebook, or message me at EmilyCates@townline.org.

Happy searching for dream seeds!

Read part two here: Seeds of your dreams, Part 2 (G-H)

Read part three here: Seeds of your dreams: Find joy in a seed catalog, Part 3 (H-N)

GARDEN WORKS: A garden on your countertop

Countertop Sprouts

Emily Catesby Emily Cates

Growing fresh, delicious, nutritious sprouts for the winter table

Brrr! I don’t know about you, but the most I’m getting out of my garden right now is icicles. Wouldn’t it be nice to grow something fresh and green? Is it even possible when it’s so cold outside?

Enter sprouts, the superheroes of nutrition – here to save the day! Not only are freshly prepared sprouts delicious, but they are alive and loaded with vitamins, minerals, and enzymes that are very good for you. As an added bonus, they are inexpensive, easy to grow, and take up very little room in the kitchen. Kids are oftentimes fascinated at the sight of germinating seeds- which affords all of us an opportunity to enjoy a closer, more personal relationship with the food we eat. And even folks in urban areas and those with limited space can enjoy the benefits of fresh, delicious, nutritious sprouts.

If you’d like to give it a try, the first thing you might like to do is find a source of sprouting seeds. Clover, alfalfa, wheat berries, mung beans, fenugreek, onion, and chia are some popular choices. Whole grains like brown rice, wheat berries, whole barley, rye, quinoa, millet, and beans are easier to digest and even more nutritious when sprouted. (I always prepare them this way before cooking and thoroughly enjoy it!) A word of caution, though: Never sprout treated seeds and always make sure your seeds are food-grade. Some seeds such as those from tomatoes, potatoes, and other nightshade vegetables are poisonous when sprouted. And, of course, use common sense while growing sprouts. When in doubt to the freshness or safety of sprouts that have an off-odor or develop mold, throw them out and try again. Keep records when starting out to streamline the learning experience.

With that in mind, a great source for sprouting seed is local health food stores. Sometimes seed companies like Pinetree and Johnny’s sell sprouting seeds along with special sprouting equipment. (For a long term, sustainable source of sprouting seed stock, try starting your own crop outside in the spring.) For best results, use fresh seeds and store the unused portions in a cool, dry location in an airtight glass jar. The freezer is by far the best place for long-term storage of seeds. Just make sure to let the jar warm to room temperature before opening to prevent the formation of moisture on the seeds. That will keep any seeds from that batch from losing their viability if they are to be stored again.

Now that you have obtained the seeds, it’s time to start sprouting! Germination will occur sooner in a warm room. There are several different methods of growing sprouts, but I have found this way to be the easiest: Soak the seeds in water overnight. Use a strainer or colander for the sprouting vessel, and line it with screen or cheesecloth if the holes are large enough for seeds to fall out. Then place the seeds no more than 2 cm thick in the vessel and rinse several times each day. Keep them moist but not waterlogged. In a day or two, depending on the seed, you should see some action. The seeds can be eaten soon after they have sprouted or a while later when they have grown a couple inches or longer. Experiment on what suits your taste. Expose the sprouts to sunlight until they turn green with nutrition. Then enjoy some fresh garden goodness straight from your countertop!

GARDEN WORKS: Winter time hints to calm the chill

Emily Catesby Emily Cates

The cold winter winds dance along the frozen landscape, whispering their secrets to the trees swaying to the beat of a timeless song of the season. Shaking the snow from their limbs, they remind me of slow-motion pets stepping inside to dry off, throwing wet snowflakes in every direction. (Of course, I seem to always be within distance of getting snow-showered whenever this happens.)

As we venture into the coldest and darkest time of the year, little things that add warmth and comfort can add up to needed enjoyment. In this article, let’s look at a few things to brighten our winter days. If you have any suggestions, please feel free to send a message!

Working outdoors on a nice winter’s day is one of my favorite things to do – if done right. Of course, I always make sure to bundle up and wear my warm boots. If I’m outside for a while, or it’s really cold, then I’ll place some warmers in my boots and mittens. These foot and hand warmers, as well as medical hot packs that I’ve found to work comparably, are found in stores and online.

Though I consider warmers a tad spendy, they are necessary for hands and feet that have been overexposed to the cold in times past and consequently sensitized. Folks, don’t ever ignore cold hands and feet! You’ll regret it, I promise, like I have from the time I was a kid and went through swampy ice up to my knees and in my boots. Ever since then my feet get mad at me when they’re cold – especially when there are steel-toed or inadequate boots involved. In my not-so-humble opinion, it’s better to be warm and look silly, than to be fashionable and freezing!

Speaking of hands and feet, these parts of us may need extra attention this time of year. The wintertime environment both indoors and out has a tendency to promote dry, chapped skin. Lips, face, and hands are especially vulnerable parts that could need a little TLC.

Want to know some healing salve recipes I’ve found to be especially useful? Since I’m really bad at measuring when I make things, I’ll give you the concept: Start with a fat for a base. I mostly use Shea butter – but coconut oil, olive oil, beeswax, cocoa butter, mango butter, vitamin E, and jojoba oil are good, too. Lard and bear fat are traditional. These can be used singly or in combinations that work for you.

Safe, common herbs and such I have used that add soothing and healing properties include elder flowers, balsam fir, mallow, plantain, and calendula petals. Essential oils like rose, lavender, orange, clove, vanilla, or others can be added at the end of infusing to impart scent to the salve. (Follow directions on bottles since essential oils are really concentrated! Also, make sure to positively identify all ingredients. Test a small area of the skin with finished product salve to make sure it doesn’t cause irritation.)

Ratios of fat to dried plant material depend on availability and desired strength. I usually crumble dried plant material by hand or with a coffee grinder in amounts that “feel” right. (Consult a reputable source for specific ratios.) Combine the fat with herbs in a pot over low heat and gently stir once any solid fats have melted. Keep on low heat for several hours until sufficiently infused or until the desired strength is attained. (I leave my pots of salves on top of the wood stove on trivets overnight.) Strain the salve, add essential oils if using, and carefully pour into clean jars. Don’t forget to label what you’ve got and the date you made it.

Of course, a nice cup of hot tea and cuddly blankets should be on every winter list. To top it all off, how about a favorite seed catalog, a comfy chair, and a warm wood stove? Ah, now that’s good living!

GARDEN WORKS: Wrapping up for winter

Emily Catesby Emily Cates

Are we ready for Old Man Winter? We should be, since Mother Nature seems to be making up her mind that she’s here!

Many opportunities in the garden like digging and planting are lost when the ground freezes. The good news, though, is there may be a little time left for winterizing our garden and orchard now. The effort expended will reward us next year with fewer frustrations and heartaches, and much more satisfaction with our hard work. A case in point is all those wonderful fruit trees we invested our time and money in. At twenty-five bucks a pop, a tree will potentially pay for itself many times over — that is, if it thrives and survives long enough to make it worth our while. Chances are if a young tree successfully makes it through the winter, then it will be more likely to do well in the future. That’s why winter care is so vital and should not be overlooked, especially in beginning of the season and early on in a tree’s lifespan. The following are suggestions with trees in mind — though they should work well with vines (such as grapes), cane fruits, and shrubs.

The challenges for trees in the wintertime are unique. An important thing to keep in mind is that the snow can both help and hurt a tree. It helps in that it acts as a protective blanket that holds in warmth, thus enabling a tree to be fully hardy in northern areas. However, this blanket will also house unwelcome guests such as rodents who chew the bark and damage the tree. Foil the rascals with tin foil- simply make a collar and wrap the tree trunk at the base and up a foot or two. Or use hardware cloth, window screening, or a tree guard from a garden store. Remember to regularly check the collar and allow room for the growing trunk, keeping an eye out for girdling and abrasion if rigid materials are used.

Winter sun might brighten our day, but it can reflect on the snow pack and harm the trunk of a tree. Trees in the woods seem to have less of this problem since the light is more diffused, but it can be a bigger issue in an orchard planting. Sunscald can be remedied by a coat of interior latex paint mixed with joint compound and painted onto the trunk. (This, incidentally, also makes it easier to spot borer damage on pear and apple trees.) The FEDCO Trees catalog has a great recipe for an organic option using quick lime, milk, and linseed oil. Tin foil may once again come to the rescue for this problem; it’s also good for minimizing the danger of being smoosh­ed by the snow­ plow. I can’t tell you how many times I’ve heard of an unfortunate tree or shrub meeting its end this way — so let’s be sure to clearly mark our beloved trees and keep them safe!

A good layer of mulch around trees to their drip edge can be applied or renewed at this time. Mulching will help conserve moisture and nutrients, moderate soil temperatures, encourage earthworms, and keep weeds in check. Bark mulch, pebbles, old sawdust, shredded leaves, untreated cardboard, newspaper, rotted manure, and compost are preferable to hay, which encourages rodents. Be sure to pull the mulch a few inches away from the trunk. If possible, try to delay pruning until late winter, unless removing dead or diseased parts of the tree (unless you have a tree or shrub that has specific pruning needs for this time). Pruning encourages growth, which is not what we want right now. New growth is especially tender and susceptible to winterkill. So hold off on most pruning and fertilizers, and put the trees to bed instead.

And let’s face it. It is rare to have 100 percent success in the garden. So let’s take stock and walk our plot, and examine each and every tree, shrub, vine, or specimen. It may be a good idea to make the tough decisions now. Is there a tree that looks sickly, a vine out of place, or a shrub which under-whelmed our expectations? Maybe it’s time to take action and make room for something else that will be worth it. Late autumn is an ideal time for this, since the vacancy may be prepared now for planting with fresh ideas in springtime.

And while we’re outside, let’s enjoy the wonderfully crisp air, welcoming Old Man Winter to our gardens!