First place in grappling for Waterville’s Grayson Wilder

Huard’s Martial Arts student Grayson Wilder, 6, of Waterville, captured first place in grappling at the Maine Skirmish Grappling Tournament held on Sunday, November 5, at Winslow High School. Photo by Mark Huard

SCORES & OUTDOORS: Proliferation of stink bugs

Roland D. HalleeSCORES & OUTDOORS

by Roland D. Hallee

They seem to have invaded our environment and taken up permanent residence in the state of Maine. We are seeing more and more of them in and around our homes. More so this time of year when the critters are attempting to come indoors where its warm. They are commonly known as stink bugs.

The brown marmorated stink bugs are an invasive species and are considered a serious crop pest. They are notorious at attacking especially corn and potatoes. They were accidentally introduced in the United States from Asia. It is believed to have hitched a ride as a stow-away in packing crates or on various types of machinery. The first documented specimen was collected in Allentown, Pennsylvania, in 1996. It is now found in the eastern half of the U.S. as well as California, Oregon, Washington, Arizona, New Mexico and Texas.

Since arriving from Asia, the stink bug spread quickly from state to state, and is now listed as a top invasive species of interest by the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) since 2013. They spread quickly due to their ability to lay more than 100 eggs each spring and summer. The USDA now reports the stink bug can be found in 44 states.

marmorated stink bug

It is easily identifiable by its brown color, six legs, shield-like pattern on its shell, white segments on its antennas and the cilantro-like smell it emits when scared or crushed.

The stink bug gets its name because it releases an odor when disturbed or when crushed. They will emit a foul-smelling chemical when they are injured, startled or attacked.

Generally, adult stink bugs feed on fruits, while nymphs will dine on leaves, stems and fruit. Stink bugs eat peaches, apples, peppers, soybeans, tomatoes, grapes and others. According to USDA records, the stink bug caused farmers to lose $31 million in 2010, which is the most up-to-date figures available. Their ability to possibly spread throughout the country has the agricultural community nervous.

In the fall, they search for sites to avoid the winter weather. They re-emerge in early spring and become active. During the warmer summer months, they can be found congregating en masse on the sides of buildings. Stink bugs have a life expectancy of nine to 10 months.

They enter homes through windows, cracked foundations, dryer vents and door jambs. Once inside, they seek refuge in warm places, like insulated walls. It is not uncommon to find thousands of them inside a house.

Stink bugs are not poisonous to humans and do not normally bite. Although native stink bug species exist in the U.S., none have caused damage to crops and invaded homes in numbers like the brown marmorated stink bug. However, some people are allergic to the marmorated stink bug, with reactions that include eye watering, congestion and coughing.

Stink bugs present no known danger of damaging the home, however, large amounts of dead stink bugs in the walls of the home can attract carpet beetles, which eat wool. That may explain why, all of a sudden, some of your clothes hanging in closets have developed holes.

To prevent stink bugs from entering homes and buildings, seal cracks around windows, doors, siding, utility pipes, behind chimneys and underneath the wood fascia and other openings. Use a good quality silicone or silicone-latex caulk. If you need to remove stink bugs already established in the home, a vacuum cleaner can aid in the removal. However, make sure to empty the vacuum cleaner outdoors after using to avoid the odor that will probably permeate throughout the house from disturbing the bugs.

Although studies are being conducted on how to handle the growing problem, farmers don’t currently have too many options. Pesticides that are used for other bugs can work, however, unless the pesticide hits the bug directly, it won’t make much of a difference in the stink bug population.

The Maine Department of Agriculture, Conservation and Forestry asks anyone who finds a stink bug to take a picture and fill out an online survey. That could be a cumbersome project.

I have not seen any marmorated stink bugs in my home, but I have seen many around homes of family and friends, especially those residing in rural areas. Most merely dismiss it as nothing more than a nuisance and simply deal with them one at a time, as they appear.

What else can you do?

Local Dean College students perform in NFL pre-game show at Gillette Stadium

Students from Dean College, in Franklin, Massachusetts, participated as on-field performers in the 2017 NFL opening pregame celebration on September 7 at Gillette Stadium, in Foxborough, Massachusetts. Cami Dubois and Joshua Veilleux, both of Winslow, and Madison Grass, of Vassalboro, participated in the performance.

Guadalupi named to the Assumption College women’s cross country team

The Assumption College Department of Athletics, in Worcester, Massachusetts, has announced that Anne Guadalupi, of Augusta, has earned a coveted spot on the 2017 Assumption College Women’s Cross Country team. Guadalupi, Class of 2021, is competing during the Greyhounds’ fall season, which began with the Shacklette Invitational at Saint Anselm College, on September 2.

I’m Just Curious: Mother’s sayings

by Debbie Walker

As usual I am just curious. I am going to share these “Hilarious Things My Mother Taught Me…”. I am sure it was e-mailed to me quite some time ago and I printed it off for a future reference. And, yes Mom, I did recognize a couple of these and I think I have used a few myself!

1. My mother taught me TO APPRECIATE A JOB WELL DONE. “If you are going to kill each other, do it outside. I just finished cleaning.”
2. My mother taught me RELIGION. “You better pray that will come out of the carpet.”
3. My mother taught me about TIME TRAVEL. “If you don’t straighten up, I’m going to knock you into the middle of next week!”
4. My mother taught me LOGIC. “Because I said so, that’s why.” Yes Mom, I remember hearing that and I remember using it myself!
5. My mother taught me MORE LOGIC. “If you fall out of that swing and break your neck, you’re not going to the store with me.” (I love that one!)
6. My mother taught me FORESIGHT. “Make sure you wear clean underwear, in case you’re in an accident.” I would love to know if anyone was left out on that one!
7. My mother taught me about IRONY. “Keep crying, and I’ll give you something to cry about.” Oh yes Mom, I remember that one. Ranks right up there with “I want to change my name, even just a day!”
8. My mother taught me about the science of OSMOSIS. “Shut your mouth and eat your supper.”
9. My mother taught me about CONTORTIONISM. “Will you look at that dirt on the back of your neck?”
10. My mother taught me about STAMINA. You’ll sit there until all that spinach is gone.”

I’m not giving this one a number but poor Mom. If she did it once she did it a hundred times. It seems that all tops for anyone big busted have always been very low cut. Mom found more safety pins to fix any tops I had!

Since our weather has really been the pits for a few days I want to share a poem I saw in the Kids version of The Old Farmer’s Almanac:

“When pigs carry sticks, The clouds will play tricks; When they lie in the mud, No fears of a flood.”

“If bees stay at home, rain will soon come; If they fly away, Fine will be the day.”

I had to add this: When having to paint trim (mirror, around windows, etc.) you can keep paint off the glass. You can dip a Q-tip in petroleum jelly and apply to the glass where it meets the frame. When paint is dry just wash the glass.

As usual I am just curious what your memories are. It’s time to share! Thank you for reading. Contact me at dwdaffy@yahoo.com with questions or comments. Check out our web page!

REVIEWS: Singer: Pat Boone; Guitarist: Jim Hall; Book: Roosevelt and Hopkins

Peter CatesREVIEW POTPOURRI

by Peter Cates

How I Started Collecting Records, Part 4.

Pat Boone

Around 1957, I discovered the resounding voice of the then 23-year-old Pat Boone and the beginning of a spurt of hit 45 singles that sustained him until 1960. The first one that I heard from off the radio was the riveting Don’t Forbid Me (although I would not own a copy of this record for at least another 30 years).

During the next six years, I would assemble a batch of 45 singles and extended plays; and LPs, featuring both the top 40 moneymakers and selections that didn’t sell as well. Among the hits were There’s a Goldmine in the Sky; April Love, which is arguably one of his three finest; A Wonderful Time Up There; With the Wind and Rain in Your Hair; For My Good Fortune; I’m Walking the Floor Over You; Speedy Gonzalez; Dear John; etc.

There were also two LPs that perhaps weren’t mega sellers but, for me, are still worthy of the occasional spin – Star Dust, which is devoted to the classic Great American Songbook and has such standbys as Deep Purple; Ebb Tide; St. Louis Blues; Autumn Leaves, and the title song; and Hymns We Love, an album easily equal to the sacred music ones of George Beverly Shea and Tennessee Ernie Ford. Finally, Boone had the arrangements of the gifted Billy Vaughn.

The black label with the rainbow colored letters was also an attractive feature and a reason why I have gathered an array of 45s, LPs and one 78 by Dot artists from various rummage sales over the years, as well as specimens of the earlier maroon label. Part 5 next week!

Jim Hall

Concierto
CTI- ZK 65132, cd, recorded April 16 and 23, 1975.

Jim Hall

The very superb jazz guitarist, Jim Hall (1930-2013), brought together a who’s who of jazz talent to create one of a handful of truly beautiful, mellow and, most importantly, musically substantial albums to be heard anywhere. The standouts are trumpeter Chet Baker, who had almost a decade left of concerts and recordings before he self-destructed from his drug addictions at an Amsterdam hotel in 1988; alto saxist Paul Desmond, who died in 1977 from lung cancer but would especially be remembered for his over 15 years with the Dave Brubeck Quartet; and bassist Ron Carter, still alive and well at 80.

The gem in this program is the 20 minute Don Sebesky arrangement of Rodrigo’s already exquisite Guitar Concerto, one in which everyone in the group plays their heart out. Totally recommended and available for listening on youtube !!!

Roosevelt and Hopkins

An Intimate History
by Robert Sherwood; Harper and Brothers, 1948, 934 pages.

I am in the process of reading this magnum opus on Franklin Roosevelt’s closest personal advisor, Harry Hopkins (1890-1946 , who was pulled out of the New Deal bureaucracy to serve at the President’s beck and call for most of World War II. Whatever Hopkins lacked in any real background in the diplomatic or military spheres, which his boss supplied on a personal level, he made up in the intuition department- truly knowing when to speak and when not to, skills FDR prized above everything else. The President so valued Hopkins that he moved him and his family into a suite in the White House so as to have instant access.

The fascination of this relationship is written with storytelling prowess by Robert Sherwood, a playwright who served on Hopkins’s team and was a close friend. The inevitable panorama of five to six very tumultuous years in the White House, ones not matched since, are presented in a comprehensive manner. Many famous players such as Churchill, Stalin, and others; the endless intrigues; the horrific decisions and their context – are all served up in such a compulsively readable manner that may lead to at least a month of all-nighters!

Veterans honored at Messalonskee High School

by Tina Richard

On November 9, at the Messalonskee High School, the students from seventh and eight grade honored the veterans that were invited to the tribute. This was the fifth year of doing the event.There was a light breakfast and the students marched the veterans into the auditorium for the program.

They recited the Pledge of Allegiance, and Governor Paul LePage, who was the guest speaker, delivered a great message. The “Marches of the Armed Forces” was played by the high school band and the veterans from each branch of service stood and faced the crowd. The students had samplings of writings and movies in honor of the veterans. There was an announcement of the winner of the Waterville Forrest J. Pare, V.F.W. Post #1285, Patriot’s Pen Essay Contest by Commander Daniel Parker and Nancy Smith, of Camden National Bank. There was a moment of silence, taps were played and the seventh and eighth grade chorus sang “God Bless the USA.” It ended with parting words and the students marched the veterans out to the entrance of the auditorium to “Stars and Stripes Forever.” All the students and adults shook the hand of a veteran thanking them for their service. All the students did an amazing job and I was honored to be a part of it.

MESSING ABOUT: Survival is an interesting concept

MESSING ABOUT IN THE MAINE WOODS

by Ron Maxwell

Survival is an interesting concept for me. I have always enjoyed the idea of being able to solve problems in the field. It means my pockets are always full of lighters and knives and more pocket emergency kits than any one person has a right to own. Each of my family’s cars has extra water, food, flashlights, emergency blankets and other supplies. The house has supplies squirreled away in corners for emergencies. Survival has always been on my mind even though I have not yet been in a position to need the information.

But ‘survival’ has always had a clawing, tearing sort of feel: something forced on one from the outside. Survival has always seemed to be a ‘bug eating, puddle drinking, dirt pit sleeping’ sort of experience. I’d rather be careful, thanks. I have always thought ‘thriving’ instead of ‘surviving’. I was on a hiking trip and soaked my shirt with the days exertion. It was simple to thrive in camp afterward with the clean, dry, night-clothes I had packed, while rinsing and drying my day things by the fire. For me, survival will always be what would happen when my plans and my prepared equipment both fail. I haven’t done it yet, but when I do need to, I have some backup skills ready. Skills that began by watching You-Tube, but were practiced and perfected in the field.

I have lighted fires on the ice, while skating on a cold afternoon – using a bow drill and tinder set I made myself. I have slept on an automotive sunscreen under an emergency blanket when a night turned too cold. I have used the knife I carry in my pocket to make a burner and cookset from the cans the dinner ingredients came in. A burner and cookset fueled with a common automotive fuel additive I bought at the same convenience store where I bought the dinner ingredients. I have made my own string from cedar bark to tie together a debris shelter for sleeping. I have the ability to survive if I need, but my purpose in being in the outdoors will always be to thrive.

See how the process doesn’t happen just in the outdoors? There is a joy in preparing yourself mentally or taking in someone else’s experience when you can’t get outside. There is an excitement to testing out your new equipment with the kids in the backyard, where you can see the potential of all your gear. And nothing beats actually getting out on the trail and waking up surrounded by nature enjoying the comfort of a situation you put together. And that is how we thrive in the Maine Outdoors.

SOLON & BEYOND, Week of November 16, 2017

Marilyn Rogers-Bull & Percyby Marilyn Rogers-Bull & Percy
grams29@tds.net
Solon, Maine 04979

Good morning, dear friends. Don’t worry, be happy!

The Solon Pine Tree 4-H Club met on November 11 for their second meeting of the new year. The members voted to adopt a family for Christmas. They also voted to bring items for the Skowhegan Animal Shelter to the December meeting. These would be community projects for next year.

Officers elected were; Cooper Dellarma, president; Hunter Souce, vice president; Laci Dickey, secretary; Desmond Robinson, assistant secretary; Devyn Deleonardis, treasurer; Jillian Robinson, assistant treasurer; Brooks Souce and Sarah Craig, flag bearers; and Macy Plourde and Autumn Ladd, assistant flag bearers.

The members are planning to have a Christmas Party at their December meeting

Leaders Lois Miller and Hallie Dellarma worked with the members making holiday wreaths.

Several members are planning to attend a Swag making workshop in Skowhegan on November 18.

The next meeting will be on Saturday, December 9, at 9:30 a.m., at the Solon Fire Station.

Recently, the annual Solon Pine Tree 4-H Club Family Supper was held at the Masonic Hall, in Solon, with many parents and members present, Lief and I were invited as honored guests. There were many wonderful choices at the buffet table and Lief and I were invited to start the line. It was such a warm and welcoming feeling to be included in this family affair.

Leader Eleanor Pooler passed out awards. The Solon Pine Tree Club received the Outstanding Club Award again this year.

Leaders who have been with this club the longest are Eleanor Pooler with 56 years, Rance Pooler for 46 years and Doris Dean for 35 years. My congratulations go out to them! And, my many thanks for always including me for the Family Supper.

Was very pleased to receive an e-mail from the Solon Municipal Clerk and Tax Collector’s Office with news to share about the recent voting on November 7. There was a total of 267 voters who got out that day. Question #1…45 Yes, 220 No and 2 Blank. Question #2…135 Yes, 130 No and 2 blank; Question #3, 169 Yes, 96 No and 2 blank and Question #4…135 Yes, 125 No and 7 blank.

Another great craft fair coming up this week is at the Redington-Fairview General Hospital Main and MOB lobbies, at 46 Fairview Avenue, in Skowhegan on Friday, November 17, from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Homemade crafts & goodies sponsored by the RFGH Auxiliary .

On October 18, Heidi Coffin from the Cromwell Center for Disabilities Awareness visited the Solon Elementary School to offer free programs for students in grades 1-5.

The Cromwell Center is a Maine nonprofit agency who offers disabilities awareness programs to build sensitivity and understanding, reduce bullying, and help create more inclusive schools and communities. The students learned that we all have strengths and challenges, that having a disability doesn’t define a person, and that they can help put an end to bullying of those with special needs.

The Solon School is having a Thanksgiving Food Drive November 6-17. Please send in donations of nonperishable food items to help the students in this community service project. Food will be donated to the Solon Thrift Shop Food Cupboard. This is sponsored by the Solon Kids Care Club.

On September 19 and October 4, Solon students and staff participated in the Walking School Bus Program. This activity is part of the school wellness plan.

Thanksgiving break at Solon Elementary will b November 22-26.

On November 18, from 5 – 7 p.m., Huntah’s Suppah at the Wellington VFW, 9 Parkman Rd., in Wellington. All you can eat! By donation To benefit the Wellington Church and Wellington Fire Department.

And now for Percy’s memoir, entitled The Way: A loving word, A cheerful smile, A kindly thought or two… A helping hand, A ready step, They help, my friend, they do. A patient heart, A thoughtful deed, A willingness to cheer… An endless day Of service, friend, These things make life most dear. Be kind, do good, Have loving thoughts Throughout the livelong day, Think right, serve God, Be friend to all, And you have found The Way! (words by Esther Nilsson).

Season ski passes available for Quarry Road Trails

CJ Gaunce, of Waterville, left, in orange jacket, loads one of the first chair lifts at Sugarloaf Mountain. He and several others were in line at 4:30 a.m. for opening day. Photo courtesy of Sugarloaf Mountain

Waterville Parks and Recreation has announced that discounted season ski trail passes are now available for the upcoming winter season at Quarry Road Trails, located at 300 Quarry Road in Waterville.

During the winter months, a state-of-the-art snowmaking system and daily grooming all but guarantees the trails will be covered for cross-country skiing. The area offers 12 km (7.5 mi) of trails for all levels of ability with lighting on 2 km of trail for night skiing. Other opportunities for winter outdoor recreation on the Quarry Road Trails include snowshoeing and, when conditions permit, winter fat biking. A full slate of events is already planned for the upcoming busy winter season. Over the past 10 years, the Quarry Road Trails have grown into a multi-use, four-season recreation destination.

Season ski passes are available at discounted pre-season rates through November 30 and can be purchased online at quarryroad.org, the Finance Department at Waterville’s City Hall, or the Alfond Youth Center. Season passes and day passes will also be available 10 a.m. – 4 p.m. daily at the Welcome Center yurt beginning on the area’s projected opening day, Saturday, December 2.

Volunteers are needed to help this winter in the following areas: staffing the Welcome Center, youth ski program, events, and trail maintenance. If interested in learning more about volunteer opportunities, call (207) 446-7356 or email volunteer@quarryroad.org.

For more information about the area, programs, and events, call Waterville Parks and Recreation at (207) 680-4744 or visit quarryroad.org.