Up and down the Kennebec Valley: The Grange – Part 1

Vassalboro Grange (photo: vassalboro.net)

by Mary Grow

The mother and father of all United States agricultural organization is the Grange, formally known as the Order of Patrons of Husbandry. The national Grange was organized in Washington, D. C., on Dec. 2, 1867, by a seven-person group headed by Oliver Hudson Kelley (1826 – 1913), a Bostonian who moved to Minnesota in 1849 to become a farmer.

A Grange historian quoted in Ruby Crosby Wiggin’s Albion history wrote that the organization was a response to the “depressed condition” of agriculture after the Civil War. The 1873 financial panic hastened its growth.

In 1864, Kelley, working for the national Bureau of Agriculture, inspected post-war farming conditions in the southern states. He realized the need to help farmers earn their living from their land, found like-minded friends and created the Grange.

Kelley intended the organization as “an agricultural fraternal order,” not unlike Masonry, with rituals, named offices, degrees and an aura of secrecy, Maine Grange historian Stanley R. Howe wrote in a 2010 article reproduced on line.

“Fraternal” was never accurate, however; Howe credited Kelley’s niece, feminist Caroline A. Hall, with gaining women near-equality in the Grange. They had voting rights from the beginning and four of the 16 elected offices in each Grange are exclusively for women.

(Online information says in 1893 the Minnesota Grange elected a woman named Sarah Baird as the first female state Grange President [Master] in the United States. Minnesota’s current state Grange president is a woman, and so is the president of the national Grange, for the first time: Betsy Huber, of Pennsylvania, a Granger since she joined a Junior Grange at age five, has been national president since 2015.)

The name Grange comes from Great Britain, where the part of an estate used for agriculture was called the grange, Howe explained.

As the organization developed and spread, four main purposes emerged.

Economic improvement remained central. Means included cooperative stores, where the organization bought in bulk and sold to members at cost; discounts on things like life and health insurance; and spreading information about improved agricultural techniques, new machinery or seeds and other benefits to farmers.

Education, agricultural and general, was important. Granges published reports, newspapers and bulletins; many Grange halls had libraries; most Granges sponsored educational presentations on topics important to local farmers and the community; many hosted classes and workshops.

Having an organization that operated locally, state-wide and nationally gave Grangers political clout. One of the first national efforts was to pressure Congress to lower railroads’ shipping rates so that farm products could be sent to market more cheaply. Grangers also wanted grain elevators’ charges controlled.

The Grange lobbied for the postal service’s Rural Free Delivery system, so that isolated farmers would not have to choose between driving miles to the post office or paying a commercial carrier to pick up their mail. Grangers supported a variety of national cooperative farmers’ institutions; one source says they were instrumental in making the head of the United States Department of Agriculture a member of the President’s Cabinet in 1889.

Grange members lobbied for the Prohibition movement (implemented by the 18th Amendment to the United States Constitution, in effect Jan. 16, 1919, and repealed by the 21st Amendment, in effect Dec. 5, 1933). They helped implement progressive political ideas, like direct election of Senators (the 17th Amendment, in effect April 8, 1913) and voting rights for women (the 19th Amendment, in effect Aug. 18, 1920). Current national President Huber advocates expanding access to broadband service, especially in rural areas.

Complementing these economic, educational and political goals, at the local level the Grange became the social center for rural towns across the country, providing a community meeting hall and sponsoring suppers, dances and local and imported entertainments. One historian called this function especially important to rural women, who were more isolated than the men.

The Maine State Grange was organized in Lewiston on April 21, 1874, a year after the first Grange in the state was established in Hampden. Grange and state websites say there were 64 Maine Granges with about 2,000 members by the end of 1874; within two years, 228 Granges and 12,000 members; in 1907, 419 Granges and more than 55,000 members; and in 1918, 450 Granges and 60,000 members. Membership peaked at around 62,000 in the 1950s and has declined in recent years.

In 1918, according to that year’s Maine Register, W. J. Thompson, of South China, was Master of the state Grange. His wife held the position of Flora (one of three ritual stations, with Ceres and Pomona, Howe explained) and D. E. Foster, of Augusta, was Steward.

(Wikipedia says Ceres was “the Roman goddess of agriculture”; Flora was “the Roman goddess of flowers” and of spring; and Pomona was “the Roman goddess of fruit and nut trees.”)

Political positions the Maine State Grange took included supporting funding for local schools and the University of Maine and opposing the repeated efforts to move the state capital from Augusta. Augusta’s Maine Farmer newspaper, published from 1823 to at least 1900 (see The Town Line, Nov. 26, 2020), was a Grange publication.

The organization promoted causes that benefited not only farmers, but other segments of society. Howe mentioned sending care packages to soldiers overseas during World War II and building and supporting Grange Cottage to house orphans at Goodwill-Hinckley School, in Fairfield.

Since 1945, the Maine State Grange has been headquartered on State Street, in Augusta.

In the 1880s the state organization added county Granges, called Pomonas. Juvenile Granges started in 1944; Palermo’s Sheepscot Lake Juvenile Grange #106 and Augusta’s Capital Junior Grange #274 were active in the 1950s and 1960s.

A current on-line list from the Maine State Grange says there are 103 active Granges in Maine, counting both local and county Granges. Local ones listed are Benton Grange, Fairfield Center’s Victor Grange and Branch Mills Grange, in Palermo; Vassalboro Grange, in East Vassalboro, should also be on the list, according to its Facebook page.

Albion Grange #181 was one of the earlier local Granges, past and present. Maine State Grange Master Nelson Ham oversaw its organizational meeting on July 6, 1875, historian Ruby Crosby Wiggin wrote. There were 36 charter members: 34 couples, the son of one couple and an unmarried woman.

Wiggin said in 1875, only farmers and their families were eligible to join the Grange. Doctors, storekeepers and all other non-farmers were excluded.

In 1873, Albion residents had organized a local stock company to build a community hall. The hall was finished in 1874, and the first Grange meeting was held there.

Until January 1881 Grangers rented the hall only for meetings. In January 1881, the Stock Company leased it to the Grange at $35 a year, and in 1886 the Grange bought the building.

Beginning in October 1875 Grangers ran a cooperative store, buying a variety of items – coffee, salted fish, cloth, raisins, rock salt, cheese, sugar, chewing tobacco, grass seed – in bulk and selling them to members. Meetings included panel discussions, suppers and other forms of entertainment.

On Oct. 4, 1879, Albion Grange held its first fair, in conjunction with Freedom Grange. Independent Albion Grange fairs were held annually into the early 1950s, Wiggin wrote.

By 1892, Henry Kingsbury wrote in his Kennebec County history, Albion Grange had 150 members. In 1902, the Maine State Grange Proceedings says there were 252 members.

In 1903 Grangers added a dining room to their building, which they still used when Wiggin published her Albion history in 1964. On-line sources suggest the Grange had been re-established in 1957, probably after an interval of inactivity.

In Augusta, records show two Granges. The earlier, Capital Grange #248, was organized April 7, 1883, according to Capt. Charles E. Nash’s chapter on Augusta in Kingsbury’s history. The second Capital Grange Master was Samuel L. Boardman, who wrote the chapter on agriculture in the same book.

On Nov. 12, 1901, according to records of the national Grange, Brother Obadiah Gardner carried an invitation to those attending the national convention to visit Augusta on Nov. 19, traveling by train. The flowery letter was signed by Capital Grange Master G. M. Twitchell and Augusta Board of Trade President C. B. Burleigh.

Attractions included touring the city and the State House; meeting Governor Hill and his wife at “the mansion of the late Hon. J. G. Blaine, which remains as it was when he did his great work”; and visiting “the national home at Togus,” then caring for 2,600 Civil War veterans.

The Grange records say that Brother W. K. Thompson, of South Carolina, moved to accept the invitation. Discussion was postponed from the morning to the afternoon session, when Brother Thompson’s motion was “considered at considerable length and unanimously adopted.”

(Obadiah Gardner [1852-1938], a Michigan native who moved to Maine in 1864, graduated from Coburn Classical Institute, in Waterville, and farmed in the Rockland area, was Master of the Maine Grange from 1897 to 1907. He ran unsuccessfully for governor in 1908; was appointed to the United States Senate in September 1911, after William P. Frye died in office; and lost his re-election bid in 1912, leaving the Senate March 3, 1913. He was then appointed to the International Joint Commission to deal with boundary-water issues between the United States and Canada, on which he served until 1923.)

In 1902, M. F. Norcross, the Deputy of West Kennebec County, reported on his Nov. 21 visit to Capital Grange, which then had 60 members. He found there were “[n]ew rituals and badges,” and the members were much interested in “working the third and fourth degrees” under a capable Master. “Bound to succeed,” he summarized.

Later references to Capital Grange are hard to find. The on-line index to the University of Maine’s Raymond L. Fogler special collections library says the library has 110 years of Capital Grange treasurers’ records, from 1883 to 1993.

Capital Junior Grange seems to have been created in or before 1955 and to have lasted until at least 1961.

North Augusta Grange #348 was founded in or before 1899 and existed until at least 1973. In the 1902 Proceedings of the Maine State Grange, Norcross, reporting as Deputy for Kennebec County, said North Augusta Grange had 126 members and a Degree Team and appeared to be doing well.

Nineteen pages later in the same book, Norcross, listing himself as Deputy for West Kennebec County, reported on his Nov. 4 visit to the North Augusta Grange. The Master told him meetings had been suspended temporarily “on account of a drama.” Norcross gave no details, but commented, “It is hoped that the work that the Grange is designed to do is not made a secondary matter.”

19 Granges in the central Kennebec River valley, in the order in which they were founded (as nearly as this writer can determine)

Victor Grange #49, Fairfield Center; established 1874, still active.

Oak Grove Grange #167, North Vassalboro; May 11, 1875.

Albion Grange #181; July 6, 1875.

Albion Grange #181, Oct. 28, 1957; suspended Aug. 26, 1998, for failure to file state corporate reports (according to an on-line source).

Sidney Grange #194; November 24, 1875.

Cushnoc Grange #204, Riverside (Vassalboro); January 13, 1876.

Capital Grange #248, Augusta; Apr. 7, 1883.

Windsor Grange #284; June 2, 1886.

China Grange #295, South China; December 29, 1887.

Clinton Grange #287; March 1888 (according to Kingsbury; this date is out of sequence).

Clinton Grange #287, July 15, 1949; dissolved Sept. 6, 2006, for failure to file state corporate reports (according to an on-line source).

Winslow Grange #320; in existence by 1894.

East Vassalboro Grange #322, 1895; still active.

Silver Lake Grange #327, China Village; 1895 or 1896.

Branch Mills Grange #336, Jan. 1, 1897 (organized in China, most of its life in Palermo); still active.

North Augusta Grange #348, in existence by 1899.

Sheepscot Lake Grange #445, in existence by 1905.

Benton Grange #458, 1906; still active.

China Lake Grange #578, also called China Grange; fall 1974-1976?, China Village.

19 Granges in the central Kennebec River valley, alphabetical by municipality

Albion (two) Albion Grange #181, 1875; Albion Grange #181, 1957.

Augusta (two) Capital Grange #248; North Augusta Grange #348.

Benton Grange #458.

China (three) China Grange #295; Silver Lake Grange #327; China (Lake) Grange #578.

Clinton (two) Clinton Grange #287, 1888; Clinton Grange #287, 1949.

Fairfield Center Victor Grange #49.

Palermo (two) Branch Mills Grange #336; Sheepscot Lake Grange #445.

Sidney Grange #194.

Vassalboro (three) Oak Grove Grange #167; Cushnoc Grange #204; East Vassalboro Grange #322.

Waterville had none, apparently.

Windsor Grange #284.

Winslow Grange #320.

Main sources

Kingsbury, Henry D., ed., Illustrated History of Kennebec County Maine 1625-1892 (1892).
Wiggin, Ruby Crosby, Albion on the Narrow Gauge (1964).

Websites, miscellaneous.

Whitefield Lions to donate art supplies

Poster contest winners from 2019. (Contributed photo)

The Whitefield Lions Club will be donating to the local school’s art departments this fall. Due to Covid-19 the WLC was not able to conduct their annual Peace Poster Contest held every October. Every year each of the schools which include Windsor, Jefferson, Whitefield and Chelsea Elementary participates in the contest through their art department. The selected winners come to the club house with their parents and display their art work. A winner is chosen to go on to the district competition. Since the Lion’s Club was not able to hold its competition, they agreed they would contribute to each of the schools art departments hoping to resume the Peace Poster Contest next year.

School year 2020: Difficult choices for parents

by Jeanne Marquis

This month, parents are making a difficult decision: how to educate their children in the era of Covid-19. Do they opt to send their kids to public schools? If so, do they choose in-person or remote learning, or possibly a hybrid of the two? Do they choose a smaller private school if they have funds. Or, do they homeschool their children themselves, choosing from a variety of online programs available? The answers are personal and the reasons why the families select which method of education they choose is as varied as each individual family.

The Maine Department of Education (DOE) published a Framework for Returning to Classroom Instruction which includes the six requirements for protecting health and safety:

  1. Daily symptom self-check for students and staff before coming to school.
  2. Physical distancing.
  3. Masks.
  4. Proper hand hygiene.
  5. Personal protective equipment.
  6. An isolation plan if staff or student becomes ill.

Public schools in the area have been planning since July to follow the guidelines and have surveyed area families on their intentions and preferences between in-person or remote learning. Every step of the day has to be thought through carefully by the administrators and staff to keep in compliance with the DOE framework.

The buses, according to the RSU #18 website, will have assigned seating, fewer passengers and frequent cleanings. Parents will be asked to drive students if possible to free up the bus seats for social distancing.

Facilities at the schools will be adapted to help students and staff practice illness prevention. Drinking fountains will be replaced at some schools with bottle refill stations and students will be allowed to bring individual water bottles. Where possible, waste baskets will be replaced with touchless versions to keep clean hands sanitary after washing.

Even lunch time at school will be adapted by the nutrition workers adding appropriate protocol. Additional time will be allowed for hand washing prior to meals. Single-serve packets will be provided instead of sharing condiments. More room will be added for seating and serving lines will be socially distanced.

For specific changes at your students’ schools, check the school websites frequently:

https://www.msad49.org/
Albion, Benton, Fairfield, Clinton Lawrence High School and Junior High.

https://rsu18.org/
Atwood Primary, China Primary and Middle Schools, Belgrade Central, James H. Bean Messalonskee Middle and High School, Williams Elementary.

https://www.svrsu.org/o/whes
Chelsea Elementary,Sheepscot Valley, Palermo Consolidated School, Somerville Elementary, Whitefield Elementary, Windsor Elementary.

https://www.vcsvikings.org/
Vassalboro Community School.

For those families who have chosen to homeschool, Homeschoolers of Maine at homeschoolersofmaine.org is an excellent resource to get you started. According to their website, a letter of your intention to homeschool is due to your superintendent of schools by September 1, 2020. This organization provides information on record keeping and assessment of your students progress.

Local Town Meetings Schedule 2020

Town meetings 2020

ALBION

Town Meeting
Sat., June 27, 10:00 am
Albion Fire Station

Those attending the Town Meeting should park in the field behind the Besse Building or in the Besse Building parking lot. No one will be allowed to park at the Fire Station. Attendees should also practice social distancing and we ask that you wear a face mask.

Copy of the Town Meeting Warrant is on the Town web page under Government – Selectmen’s Meeting Minutes

CHELSEA

Election
Tues., June 9, 8 a.m. – 8 p.m.
Chelsea Elementary School
Town Meeting
Thurs., June 11, 6:30 p.m.
Chelsea Elementary School

CHINA

Town meeting
Tuesday, July 14, 9 a.m.
Written ballot only
Former portable classroom near town office.
7 a.m. – 8 p.m.

FAIRFIELD

Annual town budget meeting
Mon., June 15, 7 p.m.
Fairfield Community Ctr.
61 Water St.

SOLON

Town Meeting
Saturday, March 7, 1:30 p.m.
Solon Elementary School.

VASSALBORO

Town Meeting
Mon., June 22, 6:30 p.m.
Vassalboro Community School
1116 Webber Pond Road
Municipal Election
Tues., June 23, 8 a.m.-8 p.m.
Town Office
682 Main St.

*   *   *

To be included in this list, visit our Contact Us page or send an email to The Town Line at townline@townline.org.

Annika Carey receives MPA Principals Award

Annika Carey

Annika Carey, daughter of Erik and Tanya Carey, of Embden, a senior at Carrabec High School, in North Anson, has been selected to receive the 2020 Principal’s Award, according to Principal Timothy Richards. The award, sponsored by the Maine Principals’ Association, is given in recognition of a high school senior’s academic achievement, citizenship and leadership.

According to Richards, Ms. Carey has distinguished herself in the classroom, on the tennis court, and as a leader in the school and the community. She has a positive attitude, is hard-working, kind, and humble, all of which will ensure her future success.

Academically, Annika has challenged herself throughout her high school years. Her hard work and perseverance have made her the valedictorian of the class of 2020. Her eagerness and enthusiasm makes her a leader and a role model in our school.

Annika shines strong in tennis, soccer, and will power at Carrabec as she applies that same enthusiasm and passion into all. Strong and focused, Annika has played an important role on Carrabec’s teams. She is a supportive team player, she holds and shows respect for all her teammates and coaches.

Ms. Carey not only thrives in the sports worlds, but is also a member of the National Honor Society, a member of the Willpower Weightlifting Team, Youth in Maine Government, was the first Student of the Month for her graduating class and a math team top scorer. Annika made the MAML list of the top 50 math team competitors in the state!

For all of these reasons, Richards is proud to announce that Annika Carey is the Carrabec High School MPA Award recipient for 2020. Annika will attend an awards luncheon on April 4, 2020, where she will receive her award and be eligible to be selected for one of ten scholarships.

2019-’20 Real Estate Tax Due Dates

CHELSEA

(Second half)
April 8, 2020

CHINA

(pay all up front or semi-annually)
Friday, September 27
Friday, March 27, 2020

VASSALBORO

(pay all up front or quarterly)
Monday, September 23
Monday, November 25
Monday, February 24, 2020
Monday, April 27, 2020

WATERVILLE

(pay all up front or quarterly)
October 11
December 13
March 13, 2020
June 12, 2020

WINDSOR

(pay all up front or)
September 30 or
Half on Sept. 30
and half March 31, 2020

Whitefield Lions announce peace poster contest winners

First place posters that will move on to the state competition, from left to right, Addison Turner (Palermo), Jade McCollette (Chelsea), Donovan Thompson (Whitefield), and Barry Tibbetts on behalf of Lillian Brooks (Jefferson). (Contributed photo)

The Whitefield Lions club took part in judging Peace Posters from four different schools – Jefferson, Whitefield, Chelsea, Palermo. The contest asked the students to draw the Journey to Peace. At the Thursday meeting, the winners from the contest came to the Whitefield Lions club to receive recognition and awards. The first place winners will move on to the next round of competition. the Lions are an international service group and this competition will eventually display the final winning posters at the United Nations Lions Day.

Winners from Palermo Elementary School, from left to right, Brody Worth, Lion Kim Haskell, Addison Turner and Mara Mangin. (Contributed photo)

Winners from Whitefield Elementary School, from left to right, Lion Kim Haskell on behalf of Katie Shaw, Ory Winchenbach and Donavon Thompson. (Contributed photo)

Winners from Jefferson Elementary, from left to right, David Winchenbach and Kaylee Lappen. Absent from photo, Lillian Brooks. (Contributed photo)

Winners from Chelsea Elementary, from left to right, Trinity DeGrenier, Lion Kim Haskell and Alyssa Pullen. Absent from photo, Jade McCollette. (Contributed photo)

Catherine Riley named to Cedarville University dean’s honor list

Catherine Riley, a mathematics major from Chelsea, was named to the dean’s honors list at Cedarville University, in Cedarville, Ohio.

This recognition required Riley to maintain a 3.75 minimum GPA while carrying at least 12 credit hours during spring semester 2019.

Erskine Bus Schedule – Fall 2019

(photo credit: Erskine Academy)

Chelsea Run:​ ​Sheila Westcott Bus #2 (Chelsea/Whitefield/Windsor)

1. Leave Erskine – 6:10
2. At Legion Park Rd. – 6:20
3. Barton Rd./Jones Rd. – 6:28
4. Route 105/Route 32 – 6:30
5. Route 32/Route 17 (Rideout’s) -6:38
6. Chelsea School – 6:45
7. Hunts Meadow Rd. – 6:55
8. Hunts Meadow Rd./Cooper Rd. 7:00
9. Hunts Meadow Rd./Route 126 – 7:05
10. Route 126/Vigue Rd. – 7:10
11. Route 17/Route 32 (Rideout’s) – 7:20
12. Route 32 to Erskine – 7:30

Whitefield Run: ​ Mark Johnson Bus #6 (Whitefield/Windsor)

1. Leave Peaslee’s – 6:15
2. Route 17 Country Corners Store – 6:17
3. Route 17/Route 32 (Rideouts) – 6:22
4. Maxcy Mills Rd. – 6:26
5. Griffin Rd. – 6:28
6. Vigue Rd. – 6:35
7. Townhouse Rd. – 6:37
8. Heath Rd. – 6:46
9. Hilton Rd. – 6:52
10. Route 218 Sennott Rd. – 6:59
11. Route 218 Cookson Ln. – 7:01
12. Cooper Rd. -7:03
13. Wingood Rd. – 7:05
14. Cooper Rd. – 7:09
15. Windsor Rd. – 7:12
16. Route 105 – 7:20
17. Route 32 – 7:22
18. Route 32 Crosby Rd. – 7:23
19. Route 32 Elm Ln. – 7:24
20. Route 32 Choate Rd. – 7:25
21. Route 32 to Erskine – 7:30

Jefferson Run:​ Mike Lamontagne Bus #3 (Jefferson)

1. Route 32/Route 215 6:22
2. Route 32 North Mountain Rd. – 6:24
3. Jefferson Fire Station – 6:29
4. Route 32/Orffs Corner Rd. – 6:34
5. Goose Hill Rd./Hodgkins Hill Rd. – 6:38
6. Goose Hill Rd./Washington Rd. – 6:42
7. Valley Rd. – 6:43
8. Valley Rd./Route 17 – 6:48
9. Route 17/Route 32 – 6:54
10. Route 32/Route 215 N. Clary Rd. – 6:56
11. Route 215 N. Clary Rd./Route 126 – 7:00
12. Route 126/Route 218 Mills Rd. – 7:03
13. Route 218 Mills Rd./Route 17 – 7:07
14. Route 17/Route 32 Rideout’s – 7:12
15. Route 32 to Erskine – 7:21

Palermo Run:​ Wayne Lacey Bus #5 (Palermo/Somerville/Windsor)

1. Leave Tobey’s – 6:15
2. Route 3/Branch Mills Rd. – 6:17
3. Branch Mills Rd./North Palermo Rd. – 6:20
4. North Palermo Rd./Level Hill rd. – 6:26
5. Level Hill Rd./Boots & Saddle Rd. – 6:36
6. Route 3 – 6:37
7. Route 3/Turner Ridge Rd. – 6:40
8. Turner Ridge Rd./Route 105 – 6:49
9. Route 105/Turn Around Somerville School – 6:53
10. Route 105 Dodge Rd. – 6:58
11. Route 105/Route 32 – 7:03
12. Route 32/Choate Rd. – 7:07
13. Choate Rd./South Rd. & Windsor Neck Rd. – 7:10
14. South Rd./Weeks Mills Rd. – 7:15
15. Weeks Mills R./Kidder Rd. – 7:17
16. Kidder Rd./To Erskine – 7:20

Peace poster contest winners announced in Whitefield

Winners of the Peace Poster Contest with their respective art teachers, from left to right, Rachel Richmond and Abby St. Cyr, Jefferson; Amanda Martin and Lineo Kelley, Whitefield; Lion Calvin Prescott, Alyvia Colfer and Sandy Dunn, Chelsea; Nathan Hall and Genevieve Keller, Windsor; Lion Barry Tibbetts. (Contributed photo)

Winners of the Peace Poster Contest were honored with their art teachers by the Whitefield Lions Club on October 25.

For over 30 years Lions clubs around the world have sponsored the Lions International Peace Poster Contest.

The theme of the 2018-2019 contest is “Kindness Matters.”

Winners listed by school:

Whitefield: Art teacher Amanda Martin.

1st place – Lineo Kelley; 2nd place – Olivia Brann; 3rd place – Kat Thorton.

Jefferson: Art teacher Rachel Richmond.

1st plac – Abby St Cyr; 2nd place – Eliza Wood-Orff; 3rd place – Lillian Brooks.

Chelsea: Art teacher Sandy Dunn.

1st place – Alyvia Colfer; 2nd place – Jac Crochere; 3rd plac e- Brooke Michaud.

Windsor: Art teacher Genevieve Keller.

1st place – Nathan Hall; 2nd place – Mackenzie Kutniewski; 3rd place – Eva Carlezon.