ERIC’S TECH TALK – Kids and social media: What to know

by Eric W. Austin

Probably the most invasive aspect of the technological revolution in the last two decades is the ubiquity of social media in our daily lives. From entire articles in the New York Times devoted to the 280 characters tweeted by the president during his morning absolution, to the fact that Facebook is the most popular source of news for millions of Americans, it’s impossible to escape the influence of social media.

Children born after the new millennium have grown up with a daily digest of this bite-sized brain spill. How is it affecting them, and how has their use of it changed over time?

A new study released this year tries to answer some of those questions. This survey of teen social media use was sponsored by Common Sense Media, a nonprofit which describes itself as “the leading independent nonprofit organization dedicated to helping kids thrive in a world of media and technology.”

The survey of 1,141 adolescents between the ages of 13 and 17 is a follow-up to an earlier study the organization did of 1,000 teens back in 2012. Each survey was conducted on a separate and random cross-section of teens of different ethnicities, socio-economic backgrounds and geographic locations, proportional to their representation in the U.S. population.

Common Sense Media aims to “empower parents, teachers, and policymakers by providing unbiased information, trusted advice, and innovative tools to help them harness the power of media and technology as a positive force in all kids’ lives.”

Their website is very well organized, and I highly recommend it to parents and teachers trying to navigate the increasingly complex web of social media services available online.

According to the new study, although the number of teens who use social media, about 81 percent, hasn’t changed from the survey done six years ago, other factors, such as frequency of use, have changed significantly.

In 2012, only 34 percent of teens surveyed said they use social media more than once daily. Today that number has more than doubled, with 70 percent now saying they access social media multiple times per day. In fact, 34 percent of teens report using social media several times an hour, and 16 percent admitted to using it “almost constantly.”

Some of this increase, according to the researchers, may have to do with a substantial increase in teens’ access to mobile devices. Teens with smartphones has more than doubled in the last six years, from 41 to 89 percent and – if you include those who access social media from a non-phone device, such as an iPad or Android tablet – that number rises to 93 percent.

Facebook as the dominant social media site has also declined dramatically in the six years since the last survey was taken. In 2012, 68 percent of teens listed Facebook as their primary social media site. In the latest study from 2018, that number has dropped to only 15 percent, with Snapchat rising to the top with 41 percent, and Instagram at 22 percent.

One 16-year old respondent, when asked who she still talks to on Facebook, responded, “My grandparents.”

Along with organizing teen respondents according to household income, ethnicity, age and gender, the survey administrators also rated each teen on something called a social-emotional well-being (SEWB) scale. This “11-item scale measures attributes related to SEWB in adolescents as identified by the National Institute for Clinical Excellence (such as happiness, depression, loneliness, confidence, self-esteem, and parental relations).”

Teens were presented with a series of statements regarding these topics, and asked whether they thought the statements were “a lot,” “somewhat,” “not too much,” or “not at all” like them. Then, each teen was assigned to one of three groups depending on their responses: the high end of the scale (19 percent of respondents), the medium group (63 percent), or the low end of the SEWB scale (17 percent).

There were significant differences between groups organized on this SEWB scale. For example, nearly half of those surveyed on the low end of this scale, 46 percent, said social media is “extremely” or “very” important to their lives, compared to just 32 percent of those rated at the high end of the scale.

While an overwhelming majority of teens surveyed indicate social media has had a positive impact on how they feel about themselves, those on the lower end of the SEWB scale were more likely to report a negative experience. For instance, nearly 70 percent of those on the low end report feeling left out or excluded on social media, compared with just 29 percent at the high end. In addition, 43 percent on the low end reported an experience of cyberbullying online, while only 5 percent in the upper group related similar experiences.

By a high majority, however, even those on the lower end of the SEWB scale report that social media has had a greater positive effect than a negative one on their lives. In fact, according to the survey, those at the lower end are actually more likely to say social media has a generally positive effect on them.

There have been some other important changes over the last six years as well. Whereas in 2012 “face-to-face” was still the preferred method of interacting with their peers, the most recent study has seen the number of teens preferring face-to-face contact drop from 49 percent to 32 percent. Texting is now the most popular method of communicating, with 35 percent of teens listing it as their number one way to connect with friends.

And teens seem ahead of the curve when looking at the dangers of social media addiction. Fifty-four percent of respondents concede that social media “often distracts me when I should be paying attention to the people I’m with,” up from 44 percent in 2012. As well, nearly half (44 percent) admit to being frustrated with friends for using their devices when they are hanging out together.

It should also be noted that 33 percent of teens expressed a desire that their parents spend less time on their own devices, a 12-point increase from 2012.

And with all the controversy about the power big tech companies have to sway public opinion, kids have already figured this out, with 72 percent of teens thinking tech companies manipulate users to get them to spend more time on their platforms.

Teens also expressed a mixed record on self-regulation when it comes to putting down their devices at important times, with 56 percent saying they do so: for meals (42 percent), visiting with family (31 percent), or doing homework (31 percent).

The teens surveyed were also asked about cyberbullying. 13 percent admitted to having “ever” experienced bullying online. Nine percent said they had been bullied online “many” or “a few times”, with the rest saying “once or twice”. Twenty-three percent of teens surveyed claim to have tried to help a classmate who was cyberbullied, either by talking to the individual, reporting the situation to an adult, or posting positive comments online to counter negative content.

According to the study, the most important aspect of social media for teens is the ability it gives them to express themselves creatively. More than one in four, 27 percent, of respondents said social media was an “extremely” or “very” important avenue for creative self-expression.

In an open-ended comment section on the survey, one 17-year old girl wrote that “[s]ocial media allows me to have a creative outlet to express myself,” while a 14-year old African-American girl said, “I get to share things I make.”

Several conclusions were highlighted by the researchers in their report. Overall, teens seem to find social media a generally positive addition to their lives, and there doesn’t seem to be any clear link between increases in depression rates and social media use.

Also, teens seem extremely savvy when it comes to the addictive nature of social media, and the attempts by tech companies to rope them into using it, more so perhaps than their parents. However, as with drug use, those on the lower end of the social-emotional well-being scale are more vulnerable to its negative effects.

Social media, whether it’s Facebook, Twitter, Snapchat, or something else that has yet to come along, is here to stay, a permanent remodeling of our social context, like television in the 1960s or radio before that. It has its negative and positive effects, like everything else, and it’s up to parents to guide their kids in using it wisely, and developing healthy habits that will carry them into adulthood.

Eric W. Austin writes about technology and community issues. He can be reached by email at ericwaustin@gmail.com.

Legal Notices, Week of September 20, 2018

STATE OF MAINE
PROBATE COURT
COURT ST.,
SKOWHEGAN, ME
SOMERSET, ss
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
18-A MRSA sec. 3-801

The following Personal Representatives have been appointed in the estates noted. The first publication date of this notice September 20, 2018.

If you are a creditor of an estate listed below, you must present your claim within four months of the first publication date of this Notice to Creditors by filing a written statement of your claim on a proper form with the Register of Probate of this Court or by delivering or mailing to the Personal Representative listed below at the address published by his name, a written statement of the claim indicating the basis therefore, the name and address of the claimant and the amount claimed or in such other manner as the law may provide. See 18-A MRSA 3-804.

2018-256 – Estate of ROGER A. RICHARDS, SR., late of Harmony, Me deceased. Peggy Roy, 56442 Griffin Road, Callahan, FL 32011 appointed Personal Representative.

2018-257 – Estate of DOROTHY A. BELANGER, late of Fairfield, Me deceased. Russell J. Belanger, 278 Ridge Road, Fairfield, Maine 04937 appointed Personal Representative.

2018-258 – Estate of BEVERLY K. CARSLEY aka BEVERLY E. CARSLEY, late of Palmyra, Me deceased. Kerry D. Carsley, 12 Wentworth Avenue, Newport, Me 04953 appointed Personal Representative.

2018-259 – Estate of ARLINE D. FOWLER, late of Madison, Me deceased. Shirley A. St. Peter, 899 Eastern Ave., Holden, Me 04429 appointed Personal Representative.

2018-261 – Estate of BONNIE K. GENNA, late of Detroit, Me deceased. Anthony J. Genna, 589 Troy Road, Detroit, Me 04929 appointed Personal Representative.

2018-265 – Estate of DENNIS W. STRATTON, JR., late of Fairfield, Me deceased. Karla Stratton, 276 Green Road, Fairfield, Me 04937 appointed Personal Representative.

2018-213 – Estate of DONALD B. MacDONALD, late of Skowhegan, Me deceased. Mark Cooley, 57 Bemis Road, Harmony, Me 04942 and Shawn H. Sherman, 692 Bangor Road, Benton, Me 04901 appointed Co-Personal Representatives.

2018-268 – Estate of WILLIAM H. TOTH, SR.B, late of Mercer, Me deceased. William H. Toth II, 3816 Stevens Road, Syracuse, NY 13215 appointed Personal Representative.

2018-269 – Estate of EDWARD C. ST. PETER, late of Bingham, Me deceased. Teia Marie Goodwin, 28 Morrison Avenue, Clinton, Me 04927 appointed Personal Representative.

2018-213 – Estate of DONALD B. MacDONALD, late of Skowhegan, Me deceased. Mark Cooley, 57 Bemis Road, Harmony, Me 04942 and Shawn H. Sherman, 692 Bangor Road, Benton, Me 04901 appointed Co-Personal Representatives.

2018-271 – Estate of LILLIAN R. ELLIS, late of Madison, Me deceased. Carol Shibley, PO Box 92 Madison, Me 04950 appointed Personal Representative.

To be published on September 20 & 27, 2018
Dated: September 17, 2018 /s/ Victoria Hatch,
Register of Probate
(9/27)

STATE OF MAINE
PROBATE COURT
41 COURT ST.
SOMERSET, ss
SKOWHEGAN, ME
PROBATE NOTICES

TO ALL PERSONS INTERESTED IN ANY OF THE ESTATES LISTED BELOW

Notice is hereby given by the respective petitioners that they have filed petitions for appointment of personal representatives in the following estates. These matters will be heard at 10 a.m. or as soon thereafter as they may be October 3, 2018. The requested appointments may be made on or after the hearing date if no sufficient objection be heard. This notice complies with the requirements of 18-A MRSA §3-403 and Probate Rule 4.

2018-253 – Estate of ZACKAHRIA ANTHONY STEWART. Petition for Change of Name (Minor) filed by Kristen Stewart, 21 Garfield Street, Madison, Me 04950 requesting minor’s name be changed to Zackahria Anthony Schinzel for reasons set forth therein.

2018-255 – Estate of BRENDA STARR GROS. Petition for Change of Name (Adult) filed by Brenda Starr Gros, PO Box 61, Jackman, Me 04945 requesting her name be changed to Brenda Starr Stevens for reasons set forth therein.

Dated: September 17, 2018 /s/Victoria Hatch,
Register of Probate
(9/27)

Erskine 5K Run/Walk 2018

(photo credit: Erskine Academy)

The 10th Fly Like an Eagle 5K Run/Walk will be held on Sunday, October 14, at 9 a.m., at Erskine Academy. Proceeds will benefit the class of 2019 as well as Erskine’s 2018 School Spirit Challenge. Participants who register by Sunday, October 7, will be guaranteed an official race T-shirt. In addition to runners and walkers of all ages, this is a dog friendly event so well-behaved and leashed dogs are welcome. Interested participants can register online at runreg.com (for a small additional fee) or by contacting Betsy Benner at bbenner@erskine247.com.

Obituaries, Week of September 20, 2018

THOMAS R. PICHER

AUGUSTA – Thomas Richard Picher, 47, of Augusta, died at home on Friday, Sep­tember 7, 2018, following a short battle with cancer. Thom was born May 15, 1971, in Augusta, the son of Pastor Robert and Gail Picher, of Vassalboro.

Graduating from Erskine Academy, of South China, class of 1989, Thom worked as a machine line operator at Cives Steel Company, in Augusta, for the last 20 years as a member of Local #807, Iron Workers Union.

Halloween being a favorite time of year for Thom and Rebecca Gilbert, 47, the couple was married October 31, 2013, at the Kennebec River, in Augusta.

Every fall, Thom spent November hunting with his dad, family and friends. In his spare hours, Thom enjoyed tinkering with small engines, working in his yard at home and craft beers.

Especially grateful for his three step-daughters, their husbands and seven grandchildren, Thom spent several weekends every month spoiling them.

Thom is survived by his wife of five years, Rebecca Picher; his parents, Bob and Gail Picher, of Vassalboro; step-daughters Reagan Davenport (Evan Davenport), Katie Gilbert Wiley, (Steven Wiley), Vanessa Gilbert, (Joe Charles); grandchildren, Steven, Greg, Owen, Connor, Janet, Amelia and Annabelle.

A Celebration of Life will be held on Sunday, September 23, at 2:30 p.m., at the Unitarian Universalist Community Church, 69 Winthrop Street, Augusta. The service will be officiated by Rev. Carie Johnsen. Condolences may be expressed at www.funeralalternatives.net.

I’M JUST CURIOUS: More T-shirt messages

by Debbie Walker

I couldn’t resist doing it again!! I got new catalogs with message t-shirts and felt the need to share! Hope they give you a chuckle or two:

People who wonder if the glass is half empty or half full miss the point. The glass is refillable!

If you think I’m crazy you should meet my sister! (Couldn’t resist that one!)

I’m not short. I’m built low to the ground for speed and accuracy. (Believe me it has to be easier in a fall!) can’t believe how old people my age are! (OOPS!)

I meant to behave but there were too many options. (ask the teacher I work with, she’d say that is me!)

I call my fashion style “Clothes that still fit!” (How True!)

When I get tired of shopping I sit down and try on shoes! (I have better luck trying on the boxes!)

Sometimes I wonder what happened to people who have asked me for directions. (I’d have to know where “I” am!!)

Being cremated is my last hope for a Smoking Hot Body!! (Now my secret is out)

When you’re happy and you know it Thank Your Meds!

I acted my age once. It was boring! (Haven’t done it since!)

I run like a girl, try to keep up. (Not a problem here!)

Forget the glass slipper, this princess wears running shoes!

Sawdust is Man Glitter.

I am a happy-go-lucky ray of friggin’ sunshine!

Wooden Spoon Survivor (We didn’t have one when I was growing up,Yardstick!)

I have a daughter. I also have a gun, a shovel and an alibi.

Stress balls really work when you shove them down someone’s throat!

Someday I’m going to eye roll myself into another dimension!

In order to insult me I must first value your opinion. Nice try though!

I should be given an award for keeping my mouth shut when there is much left to be said!

When women get to a certain age they start accumulating cats, this is known as the many paws! (What do you think of that one Laurie!)

A little gray hair is a small price to pay for all this wisdom!

Patience is a virtue. It’s just not one of mine!

I don’t have gray hair. I have wisdom highlights!

Don’t grow up! It’s a trap!

Life is short – smile while you still have teeth!

Does running late count as Exercise?

Instead of a sign that says, “Do Not Disturb,” I need one that says, “Already Disturbed, Proceed with Caution.”

My patience dies faster than my phone battery.

You’re never too old for Nappy Time, (Right, Mom!)

Some days the supply of curse words is insufficient to meet my demands!

Not to brag but I can forget what I’m doing while I am doing it!

I’m returning your nose dear! I found it in my business,

I’m everything you dreamt of but with a belly!

Yes, I’m a nurse. NO I don’t want to look at it!

Life is too short to waste time matching socks!

I’m just curious if any of these make you laugh at yourself! I know I did. Questions and comments please send to dwdaffy@yahoo.com. Don’t forget we are on line also. Thanks for reading!

REVIEW POTPOURRI – Bizet: Carmen excerpts

A couple of Remington Records colorful album jackets

Peter Catesby Peter Cates

Georges Bizet

Bizet

Carmen excerpts
Remington RLP-199-15, mono LP, recorded in 1950.

Remington records was started in 1950 and stayed in business until 1957. The records themselves often had noisy surfaces; they also had very beautiful and colorful album covers, which makes them often collectible and also very expensive on different Internet sites. Finally, they had a catalog featuring both standard and unusual repertoire, artists familiar to classical record connoisseurs, and its share of pseudonyms or phony names.

The opera excerpts are beautifully sung, so many of the melodies – examples such as the Toreador Song, Habanera, etc. – appearing in everything from TV shows to ads. The names of the singers and conductor are unfortunately nowhere to be found, even on the Sound Fountain website, which otherwise contains so much fascinating info on the label and lots of photos of its album covers, including this release. Just type in the following on Google: Remington records, Jean Allain – Bizet Carmen and/or soundfountain.com, which is listed under Remington records on the Google site!

Musically, every Remington record on my shelves has something interesting, despite its faults otherwise.

Ducker graduates magna cum laude

Pierce Ducker, of Waterville, was among more than 1,700 candidates for graduation from Adelphi University, in Garden City, in New York. Commencement ceremonies took place in NYCB Live’s Nassau Coliseum on May 18, 2018. Pierce graduated magna cum laude earning a bachelor of fine arts in theatre arts.

Better communication between agencies topic of Vassalboro selectmen’s meeting

by Mary Grow

Communication was the theme at the Vassalboro selectmen’s Sept. 6 meeting, as board members talked with new Vassalboro School Superintendent Alan Pfeiffer and School Board Chairman Kevin Levasseur about better information-sharing between school and town officials and with Police Chief Mark Brown and audience members about Vassalboro’s law enforcement needs.

Pfeiffer, newly-hired as Vassalboro’s one-day-a-week superintendent, came to introduce himself to the board. He promised to return as his schedule permits; a former principal and superintendent, he now works as a consultant to the state education department and travels throughout Maine.

Selectmen Lauchlin Titus and John Melrose expressed frustration at hearing from school officials only while the annual budget process was underway. They would like more frequent information, especially now that dissolution of the regional school unit makes the school more clearly a town department.

Titus called for out of the box thinking to find ways to fund tuition, transportation, special education and other essentials without taking money away from elementary education programs at Vassalboro Community School.

Town Manager Mary Sabins brought Pfeiffer up to date on her efforts to have the school designated a Red Cross emergency center and equipped with a powerful generator.

Melrose raised the law enforcement issue. He pointed out that Vassalboro hired Brown for 15 hours a week, supplementary to his full-time job elsewhere, but gave him the title of police chief, implying, Melrose thinks, more policing than the town really provides.

Melrose recommends either using a more accurate job description or creating something more like a local police department, perhaps by contracting.

Brown told board members he works closely with state and county law enforcement and the state Drug Enforcement Agency. They take on the extended, time-consuming cases, he said; he focuses on local issues, including spending time with students at Vassalboro Community School.

Selectmen agreed to continue the discussion at their next meeting, which they scheduled for 7 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 19 (instead of the usual 6:30 p.m. Thursday). Sabins asked Brown how the police cruiser is holding up. Brown, whose request for a new vehicle was shot down during spring budget discussions, said it is costing money for repairs, as he forecast.

In other business Sept. 6, selectmen agreed to offer for sale a tax-acquired lot on Harmony Lane, with a minimum bid of $5,000.

Road Foreman Eugene Field suggested additional road repaving if there is money available. Selectmen approved his suggestions and left decisions to him once he sees how much, if any, money he has.

Board members asked Sabins to send a thank-you letter to Steve Jones, of Fieldstone Gardens, for trees donated to the East Vassalboro park.

They approved a plan to provide enough water for the Sept. 8 Double Dam Ducky Derby, worked out by Kennebec Water District authorities, a representative of the Alewife Restoration Project (ARI) who is working on dismantling Lombard Dam and Vassalboro Days organizers.

Titus said he and Melrose plan to attend the Oct. 9 Vassalboro Historical Society meeting to discuss issues involving the society’s lease of the former East Vassalboro schoolhouse.

China projects to keep town crews busy

by Mary Grow

China selectmen’s decisions on bids for various projects around town will keep the town public works crew busy for the rest of the fall.

At their Sept. 17 meeting, selectmen took two major actions.

They accepted Bryce DeMerchant’s bid to dig a new Neck Road fire pond for $5,560, provided that the town crew do a lot of auxiliary work, like pumping out the current pond, moving needed rocks and gravel and the existing fire hydrant and managing erosion control.

Town Manager Dennis Heath said DeMerchant would do the other tasks, but if he does everything his bill would exceed $12,000. There is $6,000 on hand for the project, board members said.

Selectman Neil Farrington supported the plan, though he said he would still prefer to fill in the existing pond and forget about a new one. China Village Fire Chief Timothy Theriault proposed the pond a year ago, to provide a nearby source of water in case of fires on Neck and Stanley Hill roads.

Selectmen rejected bids for installing a bathroom in the former portable classroom behind the town office, building an entry roof over the basement entrance on the north side of the old town house and making repairs at the town office, instead assigning the jobs – except for plumbing and electrical work – to the town crew. Heath said he discussed the idea with foreman Gary Cummings before the selectmen’s meeting.

Board Chairman Robert MacFarland and Selectman Donna Mills-Stevens expressed concern that the board is asking too much of the small town crew. Heath plans to let them schedule the extra assignments as their other responsibilities allow.

Selectmen also rejected a bid of $9,600 for roof work on the red garage south of the town office, because it exceeds the $8,000 voters approved. MacFarland recommended they advertise for new bids.

In other business Sept. 17, selectmen accepted a request that town office staff administer the Heritage Tour Scholarship Fund, established by former eighth-grader Sarah Praul and inherited by her mother, Erika Matthies Praul, after Sarah graduated from China Middle School.

The fund provides assistance to China eighth-grade students who cannot afford the annual March Heritage Tour, which Erika Matthies Praul said now costs close to $1,000 per student. The main fundraiser is selling advertising space on students’ T-shirts to local businesses; individual donations are also welcome.

Heath said the fund will pay the town $100 annually toward administrative costs. Codes Officer Paul Mitnik brought a consent agreement to correct land use violations. Selectmen approved it.

Town Clerk Rebecca Hapgood said residents may apply now for absentee ballots for Nov. 6. Ballots will be available a month before the election.

Selectman Irene Belanger and Transfer Station Manager Tim Grotton said China residents will be able to participate in a hazardous waste disposal program in Winslow on Oct. 20, after registering at the China facility, and in a drug take-back program and a document shredding program in China on Oct. 27. More information is available at the transfer station or the town office.

On Heath’s recommendation, board members again postponed action on two documents, a tower use agreement with Hussey Communications, of Winslow, intended to improve wireless service in town and an internal financial controls policy.

Heath announced that work on the new causeway bridge at the head of China Lake’s east basin is scheduled to close Causeway Street from the first week in October through the first week in November.

SOLON & BEYOND: Selectmen explain South Solon and Meeting House roads construction

Marilyn Rogers-Bull & Percyby Marilyn Rogers-Bull & Percy
grams29@tds.net
Solon, Maine 04979

Good morning, dear friends. Don’t worry, be happy!

The South Solon Road and Meeting House Road have had an additional substance put on these two roads, I thought perhaps those of you who live on either of these roads might be wondering, (as I was) what this was all about….and so I went to the selectmen. This is the message from your Board of Selectmen: In an effort to allocate our budget dollars most effectively, the town of Solon will be utilizing alternative pavement preservation methods on the South Solon and Meeting House roads this year. The Pavement Preservation Treatment will be applied as a part of our overall road maintenance strategy.

By utilizing Pavement Preservation Treatments the town is able to : Preserve and extend the service life of existing pavements. Prevent deterioration of our good roads, “Keeping good roads good!” Decrease the construction time and traffic delays due to road work. Stretch our budget dollars, allowing for the treatment of more roads per year.

The information in this flyer is intended to provide more details on the treatments, benefits, and commonly asked questions. If you have any questions regarding any of the information, please contact the Board of Selectmen at 643-2541.

Another bit of news from the Selectmen is Volunteer Opportunities: planning board member, appeals board member, Coolidge Library Board of Trustees, Community Recreation Department Director, Community Recreation Department Youth Sport and Coaches. Please see the Municipal Clerk or Selectmen for more information.

Received the Solon School News recently and this is the Principal’s Message: The Solon staff and I wish to welcome our new students in grades PreK-5 and their families to our school and to welcome back those who have been with us before. I hope all of you enjoyed a wonderful summer.

I am the principal of both Solon Elementary School and Garret Schenck Elementary School so I split my time between the schools. I am here for half of each day. Our school secretary Mrs. Lisa Weese can help parents with any issues they may have and can help you make contact with me if you wish to.

Mrs. Debby Haynie continues to serve as our lead teacher and will help me to handle discipline issues.

We are pleased to offer free breakfast and lunch to all students again this year under the district’s community eligibility program. Students can buy milk or juice for snack or to go with a cold lunch if they wish to for 30 cents.

Again this year our students will have healthy snacks provided through a Fresh Fruits and Vegtables Grant Program on Mondays, Wednesdays , and Fridays.

Please contact them if you have any questions. thank you for your cooperation. We look forward to a great new year.

Our K-5 students will visit Lakewood Theater on September 21 to attend their fall production of “Little Bo Peep’s Wacky, Wonderful Road Trip” performed by the Lakewood Jesters. This is the nineteenth year that Lakewood has produced a show specially customized for elementary students.

The play lasts about an hour, and students get to interact with the performers during the show and meet them after the show. We are fortunate to have this historic theater so close to home. Parents are welcome to join us on this trip. Permission slips have already gone home. Thanks to the PTO for funding the admission fees for our students.

The following news is very important to the Anson Academy class of 1968. They are planning a 50th reunion for October 12, 2018. The group needs contact information for Deidre Nile, Roseann Spaulding, Lois Witham and Sarah Costello. Anyone with information please contact Beth Bown 474-6609 or Karen Piper: piper.karen2282@gmail.com. There is also a Facebook page for the reunion. Thank you. This e-mail was sent by Emily Quint

And so for Percy’s memoir: May your days be filled with…An abundance of happiness, Blessings that warm your life and make you smile. Friends and loved ones by your side… people who are going to treasure every memory they get to make with you. Wonderful swurprises in your life. Beautiful sunrises in your days, Opportunities that come along. Chances you’ve hoped for. Goals you’ve been striving to reach. Changes you’ve wanted to make. A song in your heart. A wish that comes true. And reminders of how much nicer this world is… all because of you. (words by Douglas Pagels)