Empty Bowls fundraiser to be held at Messalonskee

Empty Bowls has been a fundraiser for several years at Messalonskee High School. The purpose of this project is to raise money for food pantries in our communities. It is also about raising awareness that many people are struggling to provide food for their families.

Students in pottery classes, faculty members, and people in the community have been crafting ceramic bowls under the direction of ceramics teacher Sherrie Damon, to be sold as part of the dinner. The bowls will be on display for diners to choose and take home after their meal as a reminder of the event and what is represents.

This year the Empty Bowls will be held on Friday, March 8, from 5 to 7 p.m., in the Messalonskee High School Cafeteria. Cost is $10 for adults and $8 for seniors and students.

The menu will include homemade soups, salads, rolls, drinks, and desserts. There will also be a raffle and prizes to give away.

Diners can complete the evening by attending Something Wicked This Way Comes, performed by the MHS Players. The show starts at 7 p.m.

For more information call Susan Perrino at 465-9135 or email sperrino@rsu18.org.

Nine area students on University of New Hampshire’s dean’s list

The following students have been named to the dean’s list at the University of New Hampshire, in Durham, New Hampshire, for the fall 2018 semester.

Matthew Murray, of Augusta, with highest honors; Nicholas Carey, of Waterville, with high honors; Cody Short, of Fairfield, with high honors; Bradford Wilbur, of Fairfield, with honors; Carly LaRochelle, of Fairfield, with honors; Elijah Caret, of Oakland, with highest honors; Jessica Hosea, of Oakland, with highest honors; Hannah Duperry, of Oakland, with highest honors; and Adam Bovie, of Vassalboro, with highest honors.

Students named to the University of Vermont dean’s list

The following local students have been named to the University of Vermont dean’s list for the fall 2018 semester, in Burlington, Vermont:

They are: Natalie Palmer, of Augusta, and Kayla Christopher, of Oakland.

Where are they now? Oakland’s Nick Mayo integral part of Eastern Kentucky basketball

Former Messalonskee High School basketball player Nick Mayo, now playing for Eastern Kentucky University

Eastern Kentucky University men’s basketball has high hopes of making it back to the Ohio Valley Conference Tournament this year, in no small part thanks to the skills of Senior forward Nick Mayo.

Earlier this season Mayo hit a career high of 40 points in a single game, with a game average of just under 17 shots.  He holds the program’s record for career blocks, has already reached No. 2 on the school’s all-time scoring list and is likely to take the top spot within the next few games.

The EKU Colonel’s new coach, A.W. Hamilton, describes him as a “once in a lifetime player” and has said on more than one occasion that he is fully confident we will see NBA beside Nick’s name in the future.

This doesn’t come as a surprise to those of us back in Mayo’s hometown. Mayo, his parents Scott and Jenn, and his sisters Kelsey and Mackenzie called Belgrade home while he was growing up. His parents and younger sister now make their home in Oakland. All three kids attended RSU #18 and played sports in the district.

“Nick was an incredible player to work with,” said MHS basketball coach Pete McLaughlin. “Coming into our program, he was a kind-hearted young freshman (only 6 feet tall at the time) who was eager to get better every day.”

Mayo grew five inches coming into his sophomore high school season, and according to Coach McLaughlin his work ethic grew with his frame. He started having an even bigger impact on the court and during his junior and senior year, college coaches from across the country started to really take notice. Mayo received interest from over 30 Division I and Division II schools, and for good reason, according to McLaughlin.

“In my 16 years of coaching, I have never been around a player that had such great vision on the court,” he said.  “If you are open…Nick is going to find you, and you better be ready to catch because you may not know the ball is coming your way. On the defensive end, Nick has incredible timing and was one of the best rebounders and shot blockers to ever play in Maine.”

Mayo’s awards and stats speak for themselves, but they aren’t all he brings to the court.  McLaughlin describes him as the glue that held the teams together during high school. The now 6-foot 9-inch forward has been named to the All-Ohio Valley Conference first team after each of his first three seasons, regularly breaks school and personal records, and still has a humble attitude. In interviews, Mayo is always quick to point out that he’s not alone on the court and always gives his teammates and coaches credit and praise.

“We as a community are lucky because he models exactly what it means to be a Messalonskee Eagle to all of our youth,” said McLaughlin. “I could not be more proud of him! I cannot wait to see what his future has in store for him!”  The sentiment is echoed by many friends, family, and community members who are staunch followers of Mayo’s career. Two years ago, a bus full of fans from Central Maine sporting “Team Mayo” shirts attended an EKU away game in Manhattan.

The home support isn’t lost on Mayo. He never forgets where he comes from and has claimed it’s a huge source of comfort and strength for him. “My family is awesome…and it’s not just my family, it’s the whole state of Maine,” he said in a recent interview. “I’m really lucky to have the support system that I have back home and I’m thankful for it.”

“We are so proud of all he has accomplished,” said his mother, Jennifer Mayo. “Nick has had a lot of people who have helped him along the way, but when it comes down to it, Nick has been the one who has put in all the work and has taken up the opportunities.  He pushes himself every day and has set high goals. We are excited to see what his future holds.”

Area Students Enroll at Colby College 2018

The following area students have enrolled at Colby College, in Waterville, for the 2018-19 school year.

Benjamin J. Amalfitano, of Oakland, is a graduate of Messalonskee High School. He is the son of Neil and Kimberly Amalfitano, of Oakland.

Benjamin K. Bernier, of Waterville, is a graduate of Waterville Senior High School. He is the son of Daniel and Jennifer Bernier, of Waterville.

Jacob T. Burton, of Oakland, is a graduate of (high school unknown). He is the son of Thomas and Lisa Burton, of Oakland.

Jarret T. Mayo, of Fairfield, is a graduate of Lawrence High School. He is the son of Thomas and Tammy Mayo, of Fairfield.

Luca R. Thamattoor of Waterville, is a graduate of Waterville Senior High School. He is the son of Dasan and Davida Thamattoor, of Waterville.

Students graduate from St. Lawrence University

CANTON, NY (06/01/2018) — Nearly 520 students received bachelor degrees from St. Lawrence University during Commencement ceremonies held on May 20 in Canton, New York.

Sydney A. Kahl of Waterville. Kahl is a member of the Class of 2018 and majored in environmental studies. Kahl received the degree of bachelor of arts. Kahl attended Plymouth Regional High School.

Kylee P. Knight of Oakland. Knight is a member of the Class of 2018 and majored in neuroscience. Knight received the degree of bachelor of science. Knight attended Messalonskee High School.

Shine-on Oakland Day benefits food pantry

Colby Charette (and his dog Sadie) sit among the over 150 boxes of cereal collected at Oakfest’s first “ShineOn Oakland Day” in support of local kids.

Avery Charland, of Fairfield, was among hundreds of kids who painted positive messages on rocks to hide in the community to spread kindness as part of the July 28 “ShineOn Oakland Day” at Oakfest.

Oakland’s first “ShineOn Oakland Day” July 28 collected over 150 boxes of cereal, bringing awareness to child food insecurity and feeding local families who receive support through the Oakland Food Pantry. The ShineOnCass Foundation partnered with the Town of Oakland’s summer festival “Oakfest” which featured three days of community events including a street dance, farmer’s market, triathlon and a parade, where parade goers dropped boxes of cereal into shopping carts pushed by area students involved in ShineOnCass initiatives.

Anya Fegal helps collect cereal boxes in one of the ShineOnCass shopping carts.

Monica Charette, who organized the event with Foundation volunteers, said she hopes this will become an annual event to support the Oakland Food Pantry, local families in need and offer opportunity for children to participate in an activity that gives back to the community. The ShineOnCass Foundation also hosted “Oakland Rocks” where kids painted positive messages on over 200 rocks to place in their community to help spread kindness. All who participated received “ShineOnCass Kindness Matters” wristbands.

The ShineOnCass Foundation was created to honor the spirit, continue the work, and encourage others to live the legacy of Cassidy Charette, whose kindness and passion for others Shines On. Cassidy was a 17-year-old Messalonskee scholar and athlete, and a devoted community volunteer who died in a hayride accident in 2014. The organization’s mission is to educate, inspire and empower youth to make their world a better place through volunteer charitable activities.

Town embarks on Comprehensive Planning process

 

Messalonskee Stream cascade, Oakland, ME; from a c. 1906 postcard published by G. W. Morris, Portland, Maine.

Engages community to envision the town’s future

The Town of Oakland is currently in the process of crafting a Comprehensive Plan with the goal of creating a blueprint for the future. Fifteen community members have volunteered to join the Oakland Comprehensive Planning Committee (OCPC), which is facilitating the process.

A Comprehensive Plan is a broad, long-range plan intended to guide the growth and development of a community. At its core, a Comprehensive Plan reviews the history of the municipality, evaluates its current status, and outlines a vision for its future. It typically describes the community’s natural resources, housing, economy, infrastructure, transportation, recreation and public spaces, and community facilities, and provides recommendations for those components.

For Town Manager Gary Bowman, a Comprehensive Plan represents an important milestone for Oakland. “We have embarked on a two-year process to inventory the Town of Oakland and gather public input on a wide range of topics; this magnitude of data hasn’t been compiled in over two decades, and it is critical for leading the Town in its desired direction for the next twenty years.”

Volunteers on OCPC have convened for several months to build an inventory and to create methods of collecting public input. Their dedication to the process has impressed Bob Nutting, who participates in OCPC. “It’s very special to have fifteen community members volunteer two years of their time, energy, and skill. Their volunteerism illustrates the passion OCPC members have for the Town of Oakland,” said OCPC Chair Bob Nutting.

OCPC emphasizes the importance of community involvement in the Comprehensive Plan process. Input from the community is critical, as it shapes the vision for the Town’s future.

This summer, all Oakland residents and businesses will have the opportunity to express their thoughts on Oakland’s core values, possibilities, needs, and direction. OCPC looks forward to the community’s participation in its efforts to collect input, including public workshops and a community-wide survey, which will be going live digitally and mailed to Oakland residents on Monday, July 2nd. The first public workshop will be held at the Town of Oakland’s Cascade Room (6 Cascade Mill Rd, Oakland, ME 04963) on Thursday, June 21st at 4:00pm.

Once the asset inventory analysis has been completed and public input has been collected, OCPC will craft a Comprehensive Plan that is easily-readable and usable. Comprehensive Plans are commonly used to promote quality of life, prosperity, and dialogue between neighbors, and to gain an advantage when applying to state and federal funding opportunities.

Information regarding methods by which the residents and businesses of the Town of Oakland can voice their opinions on the future of the community may also be accessed via OCPC’s Comprehensive Planning website: http://www.centralmaine.org/oakland-comprehensive-plan/.

Oakland alumni to hold 98th reunion

Fellow alumni for the 98th year of the Oakland Alumni to celebrate on August 11, at the Waterville Elks Club.

We also invite those who attended Belgrade High School.

Alumni includes those who attended these schools even if they didn’t graduate. Come to enjoy the companionship of those you might not have seen for years. See who will receive the Eagle Award for life accomplishments. Help us to find alumni for whom we may not have addresses.

The Williams High School class of 1968 will be there as well as the Messalonskee class of 1973. Call president Dana Wrigley to have information sent so you can sign up and not miss the fun day (207) 314-6676.

Oakland, Williams, Messalonskee alumni committee members invite you.

Students named to Colby-Sawyer College dean’s list for Fall 2017

Colby-Sawyer College, in New London, New Hampshire, recognized 254 students for outstanding academic achievement during the 2017 fall semester. To qualify for the Dean’s List, students must achieve a grade-point average of 3.5 or higher on a 4.0 scale while carrying a minimum of 12 credit hours in graded courses.

Ross Sirois, of Norridgewock, a member of the class of 2018, majoring in biology.

Haley Carver, of Sidney, a member of the class of 2020, majoring in sociology.

Chelsea Perry, of Oakland, a member of the class of 2021, majoring in business administration.